Use of dietary supplements as a health care practice among older women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148359
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Use of dietary supplements as a health care practice among older women
Abstract:
Use of dietary supplements as a health care practice among older women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Yoon, Saunjoo
P.I. Institution Name:University of Florida
Objective: Dietary supplements, that are not controlled by the Food and Drug Administration, can be easily obtained and are thought to be natural and safe to use without adverse effects. The purposes of the research were to explore the use of dietary supplements for medicinal purposes as a health care practice among community-dwelling older women and to identify changes in the use of dietary supplements at the 18-month follow-up interview. Design: Descriptive design with an 18-month follow-up interview. Sample: Sample was selected from 8,344 women aged 65 years and over who live independently in a North Central Florida County. Questionnaires were completed on 86 subjects from 402 randomly selected potential participants for the first interview and 70 subjects of the original 86 (81.4%) participated in the 18-month follow-up. Setting: Community in North Central Florida. Names of Variables or Concept: Differences in demographic characteristics, health status, and locus of control were compared between the dietary supplement users and non-users. Change in use of dietary supplements was compared between the first interview and the 18-month follow-up. Measures/Instruments: The interview questionnaire was comprised of three parts including health status and use of conventional medicines, use of herbal products, and demographic data for the first interview. For the follow-up interview, the Health Locus of Control (Wallston, Wallston, & Devellis, 1987) and the Perceived Health Competence Scale (Smith, Wallston, & Smith, 1995) were used. A modified version of the original questionnaire was also used at the 18-month follow-up to identify changes in the use of dietary supplements and rationale for changes. Findings: At the time of the first interview, dietary supplements were used by 45.3% (39/86) of the sample within the past 12 months. The mean number of dietary supplements used by the 45.3% of the sample was 2.5. At the 18-month follow-up, 42.9% (30/70) were using dietary supplements (mean number of supplements per person: 2.6; 78 products by 30 subjects). Ginger, Garlic, Glucosamine, Gingko, and Aloe were the five most popular supplements among participants. No differences in demographic characteristics, health status, and locus of control were found between users and non-users of dietary supplements except dietary supplements users were more concerned with memory problems than non-users. Main reasons for using dietary supplements were to prevent health problems, to treat illness, or for both. Major reasons for discontinuing supplements were the fear of drug interaction, physician’s recommendation, financial constraints, and uncertainties about effectiveness. Neither HLOC nor PHCS differed between herbal-product constraints users and non-users. All women indicated higher internal LOC and lower external LOC. Conclusions: Prevalence of using dietary supplements was consistent among older women although there were changes within groups. However, doses and types of dietary supplements vary greatly among research participants. Compared to the first interview, more participants worried about potential drug and herbal interactions in the follow-up interview. The failure to show differences in LOC between groups may relate to the higher internal scores for all women in the study. This sample of older women was rather homogenous; therefore, Locus of Control needs to be measured in older women with variability in culture, geographical residence, and race. Implications: It is important for health care providers to be knowledgeable of dietary supplements in order to provide comprehensive health care to older women. It appears that an increased awareness of herbal product use through public education, media, and discussions with professionals will precipitate questions among users. The results of this study reaffirm the thought that older women have the propensity to manage their own health care through self care measures, particularly the use of highly marketed complimentary alternative measures such as the use of herbal products. This puts older women at risk for drug interactions and complications. As previously recommended (Yoon & Horne, 2001), it is important for health care providers to be knowledgeable of the use of herbal products in their clients in order to provide comprehensive health care. Information about the use of herbal products and dietary supplements should be included when health care providers obtain medication histories of their clients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUse of dietary supplements as a health care practice among older womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148359-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Use of dietary supplements as a health care practice among older women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yoon, Saunjoo</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Florida</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yoon@nursing.ufl.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Dietary supplements, that are not controlled by the Food and Drug Administration, can be easily obtained and are thought to be natural and safe to use without adverse effects. The purposes of the research were to explore the use of dietary supplements for medicinal purposes as a health care practice among community-dwelling older women and to identify changes in the use of dietary supplements at the 18-month follow-up interview. Design: Descriptive design with an 18-month follow-up interview. Sample: Sample was selected from 8,344 women aged 65 years and over who live independently in a North Central Florida County. Questionnaires were completed on 86 subjects from 402 randomly selected potential participants for the first interview and 70 subjects of the original 86 (81.4%) participated in the 18-month follow-up. Setting: Community in North Central Florida. Names of Variables or Concept: Differences in demographic characteristics, health status, and locus of control were compared between the dietary supplement users and non-users. Change in use of dietary supplements was compared between the first interview and the 18-month follow-up. Measures/Instruments: The interview questionnaire was comprised of three parts including health status and use of conventional medicines, use of herbal products, and demographic data for the first interview. For the follow-up interview, the Health Locus of Control (Wallston, Wallston, &amp; Devellis, 1987) and the Perceived Health Competence Scale (Smith, Wallston, &amp; Smith, 1995) were used. A modified version of the original questionnaire was also used at the 18-month follow-up to identify changes in the use of dietary supplements and rationale for changes. Findings: At the time of the first interview, dietary supplements were used by 45.3% (39/86) of the sample within the past 12 months. The mean number of dietary supplements used by the 45.3% of the sample was 2.5. At the 18-month follow-up, 42.9% (30/70) were using dietary supplements (mean number of supplements per person: 2.6; 78 products by 30 subjects). Ginger, Garlic, Glucosamine, Gingko, and Aloe were the five most popular supplements among participants. No differences in demographic characteristics, health status, and locus of control were found between users and non-users of dietary supplements except dietary supplements users were more concerned with memory problems than non-users. Main reasons for using dietary supplements were to prevent health problems, to treat illness, or for both. Major reasons for discontinuing supplements were the fear of drug interaction, physician&rsquo;s recommendation, financial constraints, and uncertainties about effectiveness. Neither HLOC nor PHCS differed between herbal-product constraints users and non-users. All women indicated higher internal LOC and lower external LOC. Conclusions: Prevalence of using dietary supplements was consistent among older women although there were changes within groups. However, doses and types of dietary supplements vary greatly among research participants. Compared to the first interview, more participants worried about potential drug and herbal interactions in the follow-up interview. The failure to show differences in LOC between groups may relate to the higher internal scores for all women in the study. This sample of older women was rather homogenous; therefore, Locus of Control needs to be measured in older women with variability in culture, geographical residence, and race. Implications: It is important for health care providers to be knowledgeable of dietary supplements in order to provide comprehensive health care to older women. It appears that an increased awareness of herbal product use through public education, media, and discussions with professionals will precipitate questions among users. The results of this study reaffirm the thought that older women have the propensity to manage their own health care through self care measures, particularly the use of highly marketed complimentary alternative measures such as the use of herbal products. This puts older women at risk for drug interactions and complications. As previously recommended (Yoon &amp; Horne, 2001), it is important for health care providers to be knowledgeable of the use of herbal products in their clients in order to provide comprehensive health care. Information about the use of herbal products and dietary supplements should be included when health care providers obtain medication histories of their clients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:44:01Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:44:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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