2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148360
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Behaviors in Incarcerated Females
Abstract:
Health Behaviors in Incarcerated Females
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Roux, Gayle
P.I. Institution Name:University of Southern Indiana
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: Investigate health beliefs, practices, and lifeways of women incarcerated in a county jail. The study purpose included exploration of the participants’ health practices as related to high=risk behaviors and their stage of change behavior. Design: Ethnography (Spradley, 1980; Agar, 1993). Sample: the participants included incarcerated females who were clients in the jail clinic. The mean age of participants was 31 years with a range of age from 19-52 years. Thirty-four percent were African American and 2% were Hispanic. The usual incarceration period was 30-45 days. Setting: County jail in a moderate-sized Midwestern city. Participants were also followed at a community health center upon their release from jail by a nurse practitioner and case manager. Variables or Concept: Health beliefs, self-efficacy, stages of change behavior, and actual practices. Measures: The ethnographic method was used in the study to conduct a naturalistic inquiry into the relationship of health beliefs, self-efficacy, and high-risk health behaviors in incarcerated females. Phases of field observation-participation-reflection were applied to examine the cultural system of these women. The key informant was a nurse practitioner providing care at the jail that is well known and trusted by the inmates. Data collection included participant observation, demographic information, interviews, and field notes. Data sources were analyzed for recurrent themes. Findings: the themes were: 1) Knowing: “I know what I should do, but I don’t”. 2) Confidence: “I do not know how I can do all this”. 3) Support: “The nurse is the only person who believes in us”. Conclusions: Participants were aware of health practices and resources that could improve their well-being. Knowledge was different from intent to change. Feelings of mistrust of the system, disenfranchment from the community, and a culture surrounded with substance abuse contributed to risky health behaviors. Implications: Nurses should continue to provide health care to the disenfranchised members of the community such as the incarcerated. Intervention research should focus on strategies to promote positive health behaviors in the incarcerated. In this study, the nurse practitioners were very trusted members in the jail culture. Health priorities include improved follow-through upon release to the community with nursing case managers. Substance abuse recovery programs and improved utilization of social resources were needed in this study population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Behaviors in Incarcerated Femalesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148360-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Behaviors in Incarcerated Females</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Roux, Gayle</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Southern Indiana</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">groux@usi.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Investigate health beliefs, practices, and lifeways of women incarcerated in a county jail. The study purpose included exploration of the participants&rsquo; health practices as related to high=risk behaviors and their stage of change behavior. Design: Ethnography (Spradley, 1980; Agar, 1993). Sample: the participants included incarcerated females who were clients in the jail clinic. The mean age of participants was 31 years with a range of age from 19-52 years. Thirty-four percent were African American and 2% were Hispanic. The usual incarceration period was 30-45 days. Setting: County jail in a moderate-sized Midwestern city. Participants were also followed at a community health center upon their release from jail by a nurse practitioner and case manager. Variables or Concept: Health beliefs, self-efficacy, stages of change behavior, and actual practices. Measures: The ethnographic method was used in the study to conduct a naturalistic inquiry into the relationship of health beliefs, self-efficacy, and high-risk health behaviors in incarcerated females. Phases of field observation-participation-reflection were applied to examine the cultural system of these women. The key informant was a nurse practitioner providing care at the jail that is well known and trusted by the inmates. Data collection included participant observation, demographic information, interviews, and field notes. Data sources were analyzed for recurrent themes. Findings: the themes were: 1) Knowing: &ldquo;I know what I should do, but I don&rsquo;t&rdquo;. 2) Confidence: &ldquo;I do not know how I can do all this&rdquo;. 3) Support: &ldquo;The nurse is the only person who believes in us&rdquo;. Conclusions: Participants were aware of health practices and resources that could improve their well-being. Knowledge was different from intent to change. Feelings of mistrust of the system, disenfranchment from the community, and a culture surrounded with substance abuse contributed to risky health behaviors. Implications: Nurses should continue to provide health care to the disenfranchised members of the community such as the incarcerated. Intervention research should focus on strategies to promote positive health behaviors in the incarcerated. In this study, the nurse practitioners were very trusted members in the jail culture. Health priorities include improved follow-through upon release to the community with nursing case managers. Substance abuse recovery programs and improved utilization of social resources were needed in this study population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:44:02Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:44:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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