Access to Dementia Clients: Community, Clinical and Ethical Considerations in Rural Settings

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148361
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Access to Dementia Clients: Community, Clinical and Ethical Considerations in Rural Settings
Abstract:
Access to Dementia Clients: Community, Clinical and Ethical Considerations in Rural Settings
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Bettie, Elizabeth
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Objective: While the challenges of both research with demented subjects and research in rural areas have been explored, few researchers have documented their experience with the dual challenges of research work in rural areas with demented elders. The objective of this paper is to identify and describe the unique challenges of conducting research in rural areas with demented subjects who may be living both in the community and in residential facilities. Findings: Working in rural areas creates challenges related to the perceived intent of the researcher. Since many residential facilities are not associated with a major medical center, conducting research is especially challenging. Identified issues to be discussed include 1) access to potential subjects, 2) establishment of researcher/administrator relationships with potential facilities, and 3) assent versus consent issues. In rural settings, facility access may be determined by the personal credibility of the researcher as measured by that person’s demonstrated clinical expertise. Non-clinical issues may also impact the decision to permit access. For example, facilities may or may not have governing boards to consider research requests, so access is determined by the perceived genuineness of the researcher. Some facilities are hesitant about sharing resident lists that include sensitive information, such as medical diagnosis, that is protected by privacy acts but is necessary for the researcher to determine eligibility. Individuals who are of giving consent for a member of a vulnerable population group also vary in their extent of relationship and commitment to the proposed subject leading to situations of contested consent. Conclusions: An awareness of the complex and varied organizational structures seen in rural facilities providing care to the elderly, coupled with a keen knowledge of the human subjects issues involved in recruiting demented subjects, facilitates entry to these rich sites. Implications: Without attention to the issues identified above, access to, and successful recruitment of, the demented resident is limited. Solid research with this population requires that we are able to negotiate these issues well.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAccess to Dementia Clients: Community, Clinical and Ethical Considerations in Rural Settingsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148361-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Access to Dementia Clients: Community, Clinical and Ethical Considerations in Rural Settings</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bettie, Elizabeth</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ebeattie@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: While the challenges of both research with demented subjects and research in rural areas have been explored, few researchers have documented their experience with the dual challenges of research work in rural areas with demented elders. The objective of this paper is to identify and describe the unique challenges of conducting research in rural areas with demented subjects who may be living both in the community and in residential facilities. Findings: Working in rural areas creates challenges related to the perceived intent of the researcher. Since many residential facilities are not associated with a major medical center, conducting research is especially challenging. Identified issues to be discussed include 1) access to potential subjects, 2) establishment of researcher/administrator relationships with potential facilities, and 3) assent versus consent issues. In rural settings, facility access may be determined by the personal credibility of the researcher as measured by that person&rsquo;s demonstrated clinical expertise. Non-clinical issues may also impact the decision to permit access. For example, facilities may or may not have governing boards to consider research requests, so access is determined by the perceived genuineness of the researcher. Some facilities are hesitant about sharing resident lists that include sensitive information, such as medical diagnosis, that is protected by privacy acts but is necessary for the researcher to determine eligibility. Individuals who are of giving consent for a member of a vulnerable population group also vary in their extent of relationship and commitment to the proposed subject leading to situations of contested consent. Conclusions: An awareness of the complex and varied organizational structures seen in rural facilities providing care to the elderly, coupled with a keen knowledge of the human subjects issues involved in recruiting demented subjects, facilitates entry to these rich sites. Implications: Without attention to the issues identified above, access to, and successful recruitment of, the demented resident is limited. Solid research with this population requires that we are able to negotiate these issues well.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:44:03Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:44:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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