Challenges in Conducting End-of-Life Research with Elders Living in Community Based Residential Care Settings

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148363
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Challenges in Conducting End-of-Life Research with Elders Living in Community Based Residential Care Settings
Abstract:
Challenges in Conducting End-of-Life Research with Elders Living in Community Based Residential Care Settings
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Cartwright, Juliana
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health & Science University
Objective: This paper describes methodological challenges in conducting research on end-of-life care for people aged 65 and older, many of whom have dementia, living in community based residential care facilities in Oregon. Community based residential care facilities are an increasingly popular living arrangement: up to 1.5 million elders are estimated to reside in these setting ins in the United States. (Hawes, 1999). Demand for these facilities is driven by the desire of older adults to avoid nursing home placement, and by states efforts to curtail expenses associated with long term care of Medicaid eligible seniors. Oregon regulations promote aging-in-place because there are no restrictions on the type of care these facilities may provide, and because registered nurses are permitted to delegate skilled nursing tasks to unlicensed staff. Findings: Identified challenges to the researcher in community-based residential care settings relate to (a) gaining facility entree for participant observations and in-depth interviews, (b) recruiting seriously ill elderly participants and their families, (c) recruiting staff participants employed by different agencies, and (d) conducting research on a sensitive topic. Discussed will be strategies used and lessons learned in obtaining facility support for the research, developing informed consent materials, protecting confidentiality for numerous participants, and ensuring respect for the dying elder and their family while collecting data. Conclusions: Respectful relationships between the investigator and elders, families, and agency staff are critical when conducting studies in settings where research does not routinely occur. Preparatory to conducting research in community residential care settings, the investigator must have ongoing interactions with key staff so that the potential value of the process for the facility is recognized. Particularly critical are efforts to insure individual and facility confidentiality during data collection and report dissemination. Implications: The shift to community based care delivery has expanded the need for studies conducted in locations that do not traditionally espouse or participate in nursing research. This paper invites discussion about challenges and strategies for conducting research in these settings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChallenges in Conducting End-of-Life Research with Elders Living in Community Based Residential Care Settingsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148363-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Challenges in Conducting End-of-Life Research with Elders Living in Community Based Residential Care Settings</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cartwright, Juliana</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health &amp; Science University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cartwrig@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This paper describes methodological challenges in conducting research on end-of-life care for people aged 65 and older, many of whom have dementia, living in community based residential care facilities in Oregon. Community based residential care facilities are an increasingly popular living arrangement: up to 1.5 million elders are estimated to reside in these setting ins in the United States. (Hawes, 1999). Demand for these facilities is driven by the desire of older adults to avoid nursing home placement, and by states efforts to curtail expenses associated with long term care of Medicaid eligible seniors. Oregon regulations promote aging-in-place because there are no restrictions on the type of care these facilities may provide, and because registered nurses are permitted to delegate skilled nursing tasks to unlicensed staff. Findings: Identified challenges to the researcher in community-based residential care settings relate to (a) gaining facility entree for participant observations and in-depth interviews, (b) recruiting seriously ill elderly participants and their families, (c) recruiting staff participants employed by different agencies, and (d) conducting research on a sensitive topic. Discussed will be strategies used and lessons learned in obtaining facility support for the research, developing informed consent materials, protecting confidentiality for numerous participants, and ensuring respect for the dying elder and their family while collecting data. Conclusions: Respectful relationships between the investigator and elders, families, and agency staff are critical when conducting studies in settings where research does not routinely occur. Preparatory to conducting research in community residential care settings, the investigator must have ongoing interactions with key staff so that the potential value of the process for the facility is recognized. Particularly critical are efforts to insure individual and facility confidentiality during data collection and report dissemination. Implications: The shift to community based care delivery has expanded the need for studies conducted in locations that do not traditionally espouse or participate in nursing research. This paper invites discussion about challenges and strategies for conducting research in these settings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:44:04Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:44:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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