Keeping safe: Teen strategies for dealing with violence before, during, and after pregnancy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148365
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Keeping safe: Teen strategies for dealing with violence before, during, and after pregnancy
Abstract:
Keeping safe: Teen strategies for dealing with violence before, during, and after pregnancy
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Renker, Paula, RNC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Akron
Title:Assistant Professor
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify strategies that adolescents use to cope with stress and keep safe from violence before, during, and after pregnancy. Conceptual/Framework: Exploratory descriptive design incorporating manifest content analysis. Sample: 20 non-pregnant teens between the ages of 18-20 who experienced violence before, during, or after a prior pregnancy were recruited for this study. Teens were invited to participate regardless of the pregnancy outcome (abortion, miscarriage, or birth). Method: A semi-structured interview guide was used to inquire about the ways teens coped and kept safe from violence as well as resources helpful to them. Manifest content analysis techniques were used to describe categories and emerging themes of coping mechanisms. Results: Teens participating in this research experienced violence from family members, non-intimate social acquaintances, and intimate partners. Experiences of rape, stalking, physical, and sexual violence were present in the stories. Teens related many coping mechanisms including exercise, distraction, placating behaviors, intervention by family members, and reaching out to others. Ineffective coping efforts included suicide attempts, self-mutilation, and isolation. Teens openly spoke of their distrust of health care workers and frustration with those that appeared not to care or “who just want business as usual”. Five themes were identified from content analysis that described the teens experiences with “Keeping Safe” including: Losing Ground: Moving Backward; Minimizing Damage: Decreasing the Impact and the Severity of Violence; Keeping Away: Drawing Inward and Moving On; Getting Help: Reaching Out to Others; and Taking Charge: Being Proactive. Conclusions: Teens were actively engaged in developing creative strategies to minimize stress and severity of violence in their lives. They also incorporated maladaptive behaviors that further increased their jeopardy. Development of trusting, therapeutic relationships with teens is essential for teen disclosure of violence. Asking about the ways that teens deal with violence may assist health care workers to act proactively to minimize damage from ineffective coping mechanisms.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleKeeping safe: Teen strategies for dealing with violence before, during, and after pregnancyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148365-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Keeping safe: Teen strategies for dealing with violence before, during, and after pregnancy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Renker, Paula, RNC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">prenker@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify strategies that adolescents use to cope with stress and keep safe from violence before, during, and after pregnancy. Conceptual/Framework: Exploratory descriptive design incorporating manifest content analysis. Sample: 20 non-pregnant teens between the ages of 18-20 who experienced violence before, during, or after a prior pregnancy were recruited for this study. Teens were invited to participate regardless of the pregnancy outcome (abortion, miscarriage, or birth). Method: A semi-structured interview guide was used to inquire about the ways teens coped and kept safe from violence as well as resources helpful to them. Manifest content analysis techniques were used to describe categories and emerging themes of coping mechanisms. Results: Teens participating in this research experienced violence from family members, non-intimate social acquaintances, and intimate partners. Experiences of rape, stalking, physical, and sexual violence were present in the stories. Teens related many coping mechanisms including exercise, distraction, placating behaviors, intervention by family members, and reaching out to others. Ineffective coping efforts included suicide attempts, self-mutilation, and isolation. Teens openly spoke of their distrust of health care workers and frustration with those that appeared not to care or &ldquo;who just want business as usual&rdquo;. Five themes were identified from content analysis that described the teens experiences with &ldquo;Keeping Safe&rdquo; including: Losing Ground: Moving Backward; Minimizing Damage: Decreasing the Impact and the Severity of Violence; Keeping Away: Drawing Inward and Moving On; Getting Help: Reaching Out to Others; and Taking Charge: Being Proactive. Conclusions: Teens were actively engaged in developing creative strategies to minimize stress and severity of violence in their lives. They also incorporated maladaptive behaviors that further increased their jeopardy. Development of trusting, therapeutic relationships with teens is essential for teen disclosure of violence. Asking about the ways that teens deal with violence may assist health care workers to act proactively to minimize damage from ineffective coping mechanisms.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:44:06Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:44:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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