Building Cultural Competence in Nursing Students: International Experiential Learning in the Dominican Republic

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148368
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Building Cultural Competence in Nursing Students: International Experiential Learning in the Dominican Republic
Abstract:
Building Cultural Competence in Nursing Students: International Experiential Learning in the Dominican Republic
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Leffers, Jeanne
P.I. Institution Name:University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth
Objective: This exploratory study examines students’ self-assessment of their experiential learning after a faculty-led nursing experience in the Dominican Republic. Nurses are challenged to become more culturally competent as the United States becomes more diverse. Moreover, most baccalaureate programs cannot provide nursing students with clinical experience in another country. Faculty from two colleges of nursing developed an intercultural nursing experience for their students and sought to evaluate changes in their knowledge and attitudes about culture after their trip. Framework: The study uses Meleis’ framework of transitions. This framework defines transition as a change in either one’s health status, role relationships, abilities or expectations that requires the individual to acquire knowledge, change behavior or redefine oneself. Meleis has used this framework in her work with immigrants, among other groups; however, in this study the subjects are nursing students undergoing a transitional educational experience. The students were required to alter their expectations and perspective after immersion in another cultural experience. Design: The study employed qualitative methodology. Students were asked to complete surveys prior to their trip and within one month of returning home. These were open-ended questionnaires developed by faculty but informed by the cultural sensitivity inventories of Campinha-Bacote, Jibaja-Rusth et al. and the work of Leininger. Additionally, the students were asked to participate in a focus group discussion post experience where their comments were recorded and analyzed. Sample: The sample included seven (7) undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students including 2 RN/BSN students. Setting: The research was conducted in an educational setting. Names of Concepts: The research explored the concepts of transition and cultural competence. Measures: The study was a qualitative design using an open-ended survey design, informal conversations, and focus group interviews. Findings: The findings suggest that intercultural experiential learning promotes cultural sensitivity in nursing care. Students identified their increased knowledge of specific cultural practices among the people they served. Additionally, they gained direct knowledge of another health care system that allowed them to critically appraise their own health care system. Finally, this experience demonstrated to them the importance of language and communication in health, especially the need for informed and skilled interpreters. Conclusion and Implications: As nurses increasingly encounter diversity in their practice, efforts to promote cultural sensitivity and cultural competence must continue. This exploratory study demonstrates that nursing students gain knowledge of different cultural expressions and practices and acquire respectful and sensitive attitudes about another cultural group. Such experiential learning should be encouraged for undergraduate nursing students in the hopes that their increased sensitivity may extend to their clinical practice with diverse populations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBuilding Cultural Competence in Nursing Students: International Experiential Learning in the Dominican Republicen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148368-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Building Cultural Competence in Nursing Students: International Experiential Learning in the Dominican Republic</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Leffers, Jeanne</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jleffers@umassd.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This exploratory study examines students&rsquo; self-assessment of their experiential learning after a faculty-led nursing experience in the Dominican Republic. Nurses are challenged to become more culturally competent as the United States becomes more diverse. Moreover, most baccalaureate programs cannot provide nursing students with clinical experience in another country. Faculty from two colleges of nursing developed an intercultural nursing experience for their students and sought to evaluate changes in their knowledge and attitudes about culture after their trip. Framework: The study uses Meleis&rsquo; framework of transitions. This framework defines transition as a change in either one&rsquo;s health status, role relationships, abilities or expectations that requires the individual to acquire knowledge, change behavior or redefine oneself. Meleis has used this framework in her work with immigrants, among other groups; however, in this study the subjects are nursing students undergoing a transitional educational experience. The students were required to alter their expectations and perspective after immersion in another cultural experience. Design: The study employed qualitative methodology. Students were asked to complete surveys prior to their trip and within one month of returning home. These were open-ended questionnaires developed by faculty but informed by the cultural sensitivity inventories of Campinha-Bacote, Jibaja-Rusth et al. and the work of Leininger. Additionally, the students were asked to participate in a focus group discussion post experience where their comments were recorded and analyzed. Sample: The sample included seven (7) undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students including 2 RN/BSN students. Setting: The research was conducted in an educational setting. Names of Concepts: The research explored the concepts of transition and cultural competence. Measures: The study was a qualitative design using an open-ended survey design, informal conversations, and focus group interviews. Findings: The findings suggest that intercultural experiential learning promotes cultural sensitivity in nursing care. Students identified their increased knowledge of specific cultural practices among the people they served. Additionally, they gained direct knowledge of another health care system that allowed them to critically appraise their own health care system. Finally, this experience demonstrated to them the importance of language and communication in health, especially the need for informed and skilled interpreters. Conclusion and Implications: As nurses increasingly encounter diversity in their practice, efforts to promote cultural sensitivity and cultural competence must continue. This exploratory study demonstrates that nursing students gain knowledge of different cultural expressions and practices and acquire respectful and sensitive attitudes about another cultural group. Such experiential learning should be encouraged for undergraduate nursing students in the hopes that their increased sensitivity may extend to their clinical practice with diverse populations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:44:09Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:44:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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