The Lived Experience of Nursing Students Working With Chronically Ill Children in Summer Camp

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148370
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Lived Experience of Nursing Students Working With Chronically Ill Children in Summer Camp
Abstract:
The Lived Experience of Nursing Students Working With Chronically Ill Children in Summer Camp
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Dattilo, JoEllen
This is a phenomenological and interpretative study undertaken by nurse educators in order to gain insight into the experience of nursing students working at summer camps for children with chronic illnesses. Over the course of two summers, elective courses were offered in which student nurses participated as nurse counselors in one of three summer camps for children with renal disease/organ transplant, cystic fibrosis, or diabetes. The nurse educators wanted to know what kinds of learning would take place for these students in this type of nontraditional setting. Following establishment of informed consent among students and camp administration, data gathering and analysis was carried out in three stages over the course of two summers. Following the first summer's elective, during which nursing students participated in a camp for children with renal disease and kidney transplants 32 students were interviewed individually by researchers. Transcripts were reviewed by researchers and analyzed hermeneutically. As the nursing students answered researchers' open-ended questions, their stories reflected several themes that appeared repeatedly from interview to interview. These were (1) Child Strength: stories of discovery of the emotional fortitude of children; (2) Normalizing: surprise that the ill children were first and foremost normal children; (3) Connection: bonding in a special way with the campers; (4) Teacher/Learner: discovery of the notion of the children as teachers and amazement of the depth of their perspective of the value and meaning of their lives; and finally (5) Practice Development: validation of personal professional expertise and level of knowledge. The second summer of the study, the camp nurse elective offering was expanded from one to three settings: camps for children with renal disease/organ transplant, cystic fibrosis, and diabetes. Following the camp experiences, teaching faculty facilitated focus groups designed to elicit students' reactions to their camp counselor experiences. Researchers were present in the room as observers only. Thematic analysis revealed a pattern consistent with the same themes discovered in the individual interviews during the first phase. After determining that data saturation had been achieved, these identified themes were validated with the students involved. The results of this study revealed that the camp nurse experience offers a unique learning opportunity not available in other, more traditional health care settings. The students universally expressed a depth and scope of awareness of the child holistically that they had not previously appreciated as fully. One student said, "I learned more at camp than I may ever learn in a lifetime." The students came away with a kind of learning that is different. Their perspectives on dealing with a chronic, debilitating disease and the pervasive impact of that on the child and family was deepened in a way that does not appear to happen in other settings. This learning experience can accurately be described as "transformative experiential learning." It left a positive impact on the nursing students that were both professionally and personally beneficial.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Lived Experience of Nursing Students Working With Chronically Ill Children in Summer Campen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148370-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Lived Experience of Nursing Students Working With Chronically Ill Children in Summer Camp</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dattilo, JoEllen</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jedat@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This is a phenomenological and interpretative study undertaken by nurse educators in order to gain insight into the experience of nursing students working at summer camps for children with chronic illnesses. Over the course of two summers, elective courses were offered in which student nurses participated as nurse counselors in one of three summer camps for children with renal disease/organ transplant, cystic fibrosis, or diabetes. The nurse educators wanted to know what kinds of learning would take place for these students in this type of nontraditional setting. Following establishment of informed consent among students and camp administration, data gathering and analysis was carried out in three stages over the course of two summers. Following the first summer's elective, during which nursing students participated in a camp for children with renal disease and kidney transplants 32 students were interviewed individually by researchers. Transcripts were reviewed by researchers and analyzed hermeneutically. As the nursing students answered researchers' open-ended questions, their stories reflected several themes that appeared repeatedly from interview to interview. These were (1) Child Strength: stories of discovery of the emotional fortitude of children; (2) Normalizing: surprise that the ill children were first and foremost normal children; (3) Connection: bonding in a special way with the campers; (4) Teacher/Learner: discovery of the notion of the children as teachers and amazement of the depth of their perspective of the value and meaning of their lives; and finally (5) Practice Development: validation of personal professional expertise and level of knowledge. The second summer of the study, the camp nurse elective offering was expanded from one to three settings: camps for children with renal disease/organ transplant, cystic fibrosis, and diabetes. Following the camp experiences, teaching faculty facilitated focus groups designed to elicit students' reactions to their camp counselor experiences. Researchers were present in the room as observers only. Thematic analysis revealed a pattern consistent with the same themes discovered in the individual interviews during the first phase. After determining that data saturation had been achieved, these identified themes were validated with the students involved. The results of this study revealed that the camp nurse experience offers a unique learning opportunity not available in other, more traditional health care settings. The students universally expressed a depth and scope of awareness of the child holistically that they had not previously appreciated as fully. One student said, &quot;I learned more at camp than I may ever learn in a lifetime.&quot; The students came away with a kind of learning that is different. Their perspectives on dealing with a chronic, debilitating disease and the pervasive impact of that on the child and family was deepened in a way that does not appear to happen in other settings. This learning experience can accurately be described as &quot;transformative experiential learning.&quot; It left a positive impact on the nursing students that were both professionally and personally beneficial.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:44:11Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:44:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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