Florence Nightingale’s View of the Art of Nursing and the Education of Probationer-Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148371
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Florence Nightingale’s View of the Art of Nursing and the Education of Probationer-Nurses
Abstract:
Florence Nightingale’s View of the Art of Nursing and the Education of Probationer-Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Ayers, Constance
P.I. Institution Name:Truman State University
Florence Nightingale clearly believed that Nursing should be practiced as an art. Many of her statements reflect this belief about nursing. But, what did it mean? And how did she impart this message to nurses to reform nursing? In Miss Nightingale’s addresses to probationer-nurses educated through the Nightingale Fund at St. Thomas’ Hospital, the importance of an artistic basis to the practice of nursing was clearly evident. These addresses provide a representation of the values and issues that Nightingale believed were important for the growth and development of nursing at the time. It is not surprising that Nightingale felt that nursing should be practiced as an art; working with people required a devotion and an approach that could be likened to the way the artist approached his work. This attitude on Nightingale’s part can be seen many times throughout her lifetime of work in Nursing. A number of factors apparently contributed to her view of Nursing as art. Additionally, her portrayal of nursing as art has often been misunderstood and sometimes mischaracterized. Objective and Research Design: This historical analysis is an attempt to characterize the meaning of nursing as art portrayed by Miss Nightingale, in order to shed some light on the historical antecedents of this important definition of nursing. Current day discussions of caring theories and Nightingale’s contributions to understanding the caring role of nurses may be enhanced through a more complete discussion of the meaning that Nightingale herself attributed to nursing as an art. The current study is part of a larger study that is examining antecedent and contemporary influences on Florence Nightingale’s efforts to develop a modern profession of nursing. This aspect of the larger study examines the influence of Miss Nightingale’s views and writings about the art of nursing on the development of Nursing’s core professional values specifically evident in her work with probationer-nurses. The study sought to determine the extent to which these values that have been evident in Miss Nightingale’s writings became threads of the transformation of Nursing into a new profession. Using historical research methodology, this study was conducted through the examination and analysis of primary sources, including letters and personal documents written by Florence Nightingale, which are housed at the Florence Nightingale Museum and the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine in London, England. Findings: Results of the present study reveal a strong message of the need to emphasize the art of nursing in the development of nursing as a profession. Miss Nightingale provided specific direction to the probationers in the artistic practice of nursing with other nurses and with patients. In doing so, she revealed her motive to reform nursing. In the words of Miss Nightingale, “honor lies in loving perfection.” (F. Nightingale Address to Probationer-Nurses, 1876). Conclusions and Implications: Implications for current nursing research and practice are evident. It can be argued that contemporary nursing is facing a struggle, not unlike the struggles that Miss Nightingale faced, to maintain the values that are important to the profession. Artistic and aesthetic factors were a strong and definite influence on the development of Nursing as a profession with social relevance and holistic values. A return to those values is becoming increasingly evident in Nursing today.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFlorence Nightingale’s View of the Art of Nursing and the Education of Probationer-Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148371-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Florence Nightingale&rsquo;s View of the Art of Nursing and the Education of Probationer-Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ayers, Constance</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Truman State University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cayers@truman.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Florence Nightingale clearly believed that Nursing should be practiced as an art. Many of her statements reflect this belief about nursing. But, what did it mean? And how did she impart this message to nurses to reform nursing? In Miss Nightingale&rsquo;s addresses to probationer-nurses educated through the Nightingale Fund at St. Thomas&rsquo; Hospital, the importance of an artistic basis to the practice of nursing was clearly evident. These addresses provide a representation of the values and issues that Nightingale believed were important for the growth and development of nursing at the time. It is not surprising that Nightingale felt that nursing should be practiced as an art; working with people required a devotion and an approach that could be likened to the way the artist approached his work. This attitude on Nightingale&rsquo;s part can be seen many times throughout her lifetime of work in Nursing. A number of factors apparently contributed to her view of Nursing as art. Additionally, her portrayal of nursing as art has often been misunderstood and sometimes mischaracterized. Objective and Research Design: This historical analysis is an attempt to characterize the meaning of nursing as art portrayed by Miss Nightingale, in order to shed some light on the historical antecedents of this important definition of nursing. Current day discussions of caring theories and Nightingale&rsquo;s contributions to understanding the caring role of nurses may be enhanced through a more complete discussion of the meaning that Nightingale herself attributed to nursing as an art. The current study is part of a larger study that is examining antecedent and contemporary influences on Florence Nightingale&rsquo;s efforts to develop a modern profession of nursing. This aspect of the larger study examines the influence of Miss Nightingale&rsquo;s views and writings about the art of nursing on the development of Nursing&rsquo;s core professional values specifically evident in her work with probationer-nurses. The study sought to determine the extent to which these values that have been evident in Miss Nightingale&rsquo;s writings became threads of the transformation of Nursing into a new profession. Using historical research methodology, this study was conducted through the examination and analysis of primary sources, including letters and personal documents written by Florence Nightingale, which are housed at the Florence Nightingale Museum and the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine in London, England. Findings: Results of the present study reveal a strong message of the need to emphasize the art of nursing in the development of nursing as a profession. Miss Nightingale provided specific direction to the probationers in the artistic practice of nursing with other nurses and with patients. In doing so, she revealed her motive to reform nursing. In the words of Miss Nightingale, &ldquo;honor lies in loving perfection.&rdquo; (F. Nightingale Address to Probationer-Nurses, 1876). Conclusions and Implications: Implications for current nursing research and practice are evident. It can be argued that contemporary nursing is facing a struggle, not unlike the struggles that Miss Nightingale faced, to maintain the values that are important to the profession. Artistic and aesthetic factors were a strong and definite influence on the development of Nursing as a profession with social relevance and holistic values. A return to those values is becoming increasingly evident in Nursing today.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:44:11Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:44:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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