2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148373
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Model of Decision Making for Nursing
Abstract:
A Model of Decision Making for Nursing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Coble, Daniel, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Tampa
Title:Executive Director
Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify a model of decision making for nursing. Design: The theoretical framework for this qualitative study was chaos theory. Sample: Thirty registered nurses wrote stories on decision making which affected patient outcomes; ten of these nurses were interviewed as part of the study. Setting: The study was conducted at a large, tertiary teaching hospital in the southeast. Names of Variables or Concepts: Decision making was the dependent variable; concepts identified in the study as independent variables were creativity, education, leadership, experience, risk taking, and informatics. Measures/Instruments: Stories were collected as a part of Nurses’ Week celebration. Nurses voluntarily wrote stories of decisions they made which had an impact on patient care. These stories (N=30) were analyzed for themes and concepts; a tentative model was proposed. Ten of the authors were interviewed to clarify, modify, or expand the model components. Seven concepts were initially identified: creativity, education, leadership, experience, risk taking, communication, and information management. A review of the literature was conducted to provide operational definitions for each concept. Based upon the review of the literature, communication and information management were merged into a single concept of informatics. The reconfigured model was depicted within the framework of chaos theory and the Chinese philosophy of Cosmogony. The model was validated by the original participants. Findings: Nurses in the study portrayed decision making as following the nursing process, with the concepts of creativity, education, leadership, experience, risk taking, and informatics floating within a multidimensional, chaotic environment. At times, several concepts were utilized in decision making but the pattern was unpredictable as to which and how many of the six concepts were employed in the decision. Few nurses reported using as many as five concepts simultaneously. Most nurses related using two to four concepts and always in a random array. Conclusions: The model is a tentative description of decision making for nursing. The relationships among the six concepts need further exploration. Further development and testing of the model would require instrument development to measure model concepts, as well as analyses of relationships among the concepts. Future research should focus on the characteristics of nurses that may influence decision making and on the environmental factors that facilitate or which impede decision making. Implications: The model may be useful in analyzing clinical decisions by nurses that affect patient outcomes. Creativity, leadership, and informatics may be valuable attributes in decision making related to patient care and to discharge planning. Nursing administrators should consider the environmental constraints to creativity and risk taking within institutions when evaluating the quality of care provided by staff nurses. Nurse educators may develop computer-based learning experiences that enhance skills in creativity and risk taking in the novice nurse. The model may be beneficial in describing nursing as an information-based discipline.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Model of Decision Making for Nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148373-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Model of Decision Making for Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Coble, Daniel, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Tampa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Executive Director</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dcoble@ut.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify a model of decision making for nursing. Design: The theoretical framework for this qualitative study was chaos theory. Sample: Thirty registered nurses wrote stories on decision making which affected patient outcomes; ten of these nurses were interviewed as part of the study. Setting: The study was conducted at a large, tertiary teaching hospital in the southeast. Names of Variables or Concepts: Decision making was the dependent variable; concepts identified in the study as independent variables were creativity, education, leadership, experience, risk taking, and informatics. Measures/Instruments: Stories were collected as a part of Nurses&rsquo; Week celebration. Nurses voluntarily wrote stories of decisions they made which had an impact on patient care. These stories (N=30) were analyzed for themes and concepts; a tentative model was proposed. Ten of the authors were interviewed to clarify, modify, or expand the model components. Seven concepts were initially identified: creativity, education, leadership, experience, risk taking, communication, and information management. A review of the literature was conducted to provide operational definitions for each concept. Based upon the review of the literature, communication and information management were merged into a single concept of informatics. The reconfigured model was depicted within the framework of chaos theory and the Chinese philosophy of Cosmogony. The model was validated by the original participants. Findings: Nurses in the study portrayed decision making as following the nursing process, with the concepts of creativity, education, leadership, experience, risk taking, and informatics floating within a multidimensional, chaotic environment. At times, several concepts were utilized in decision making but the pattern was unpredictable as to which and how many of the six concepts were employed in the decision. Few nurses reported using as many as five concepts simultaneously. Most nurses related using two to four concepts and always in a random array. Conclusions: The model is a tentative description of decision making for nursing. The relationships among the six concepts need further exploration. Further development and testing of the model would require instrument development to measure model concepts, as well as analyses of relationships among the concepts. Future research should focus on the characteristics of nurses that may influence decision making and on the environmental factors that facilitate or which impede decision making. Implications: The model may be useful in analyzing clinical decisions by nurses that affect patient outcomes. Creativity, leadership, and informatics may be valuable attributes in decision making related to patient care and to discharge planning. Nursing administrators should consider the environmental constraints to creativity and risk taking within institutions when evaluating the quality of care provided by staff nurses. Nurse educators may develop computer-based learning experiences that enhance skills in creativity and risk taking in the novice nurse. The model may be beneficial in describing nursing as an information-based discipline.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:44:13Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:44:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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