Effect of Back Massage on Stress, Blood Pressure, and Immune Function: Pilot Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148374
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Back Massage on Stress, Blood Pressure, and Immune Function: Pilot Study
Abstract:
Effect of Back Massage on Stress, Blood Pressure, and Immune Function: Pilot Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Bennett, Mary, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana State University
Title:Assistant Dean
Background: Massage is a popular complementary intervention that is being marketed as being able to reduce stress and improve health. According to Psychoneuroimmunology theory, holistic interventions such as massage decrease stress, and thus may be able to improve health outcomes by modifying the negative effects of stress on immune functioning. Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the immune system that have demonstrated ability to kill various viruses and cancer cells in the laboratory setting, and thus an intervention which could successfully improve NK activity would theoretically have the ability to improve health outcomes in disease process which involve NK sensitive organisms. However, a review of literature revealed that very few studies are available which document the effects of massage on immune functioning. Study Design and Participant Population: This quasi-experimental pilot study was done to determine the effect of the nursing back rub on stress and natural killer cell functioning in a small group of healthy female volunteers. Procedures: The relationship among stressful life experiences, stress, arousal, depression, and baseline natural killer cell function was examined. Twenty-four healthy females were recruited from an urban setting using advertisements and word of mouth. Informed consent was obtained and confidentiality was maintained. The subjects were exposed to no more risk than that experienced with a routine medical laboratory exam. The variables under investigation were measured as follows: exposure to negative life events - Life Events Scale (LES); Stress-Arousal - Stress-Arousal Check List (SACL); natural killer cell cytotoxicity - the standard 51Cr release natural killer cell assay. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depressed Mood Scale (CES-D) was used to screen for depressive symptoms in potential subjects. In addition, qualitative responses following the intervention were obtained from members of both groups using a standard interview. All of the instruments had acceptable reliability and validity. Findings: Natural killer (NK) cell function was evaluated using the standard chromium release assay. While this study consisted of a morning group (n = 11) and an afternoon group (n = 12), due to funding and methodological considerations, NK activity was only measured in subjects in the morning group (5 control, 6 massage). Results from these subjects only are reported here. Morning participants in the massage group had significantly decreased post stress levels compared to those in the control group. A significant decrease was found in systolic blood pressure for members in the morning massage group. Natural killer cell activity decreased somewhat for all morning participants from pre to post time points, possibly due to natural diurnal variation in NK activity. A trend for individuals in the massage group to have less decrease in NK activity was observed. Implications: The results of this pilot study suggest that a nursing back massage can decrease stress levels and systolic blood pressure. Further investigation is needed to determine the effect of back massage on natural killer cell activity.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Back Massage on Stress, Blood Pressure, and Immune Function: Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148374-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of Back Massage on Stress, Blood Pressure, and Immune Function: Pilot Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bennett, Mary, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">m-bennett@indstate.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Massage is a popular complementary intervention that is being marketed as being able to reduce stress and improve health. According to Psychoneuroimmunology theory, holistic interventions such as massage decrease stress, and thus may be able to improve health outcomes by modifying the negative effects of stress on immune functioning. Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the immune system that have demonstrated ability to kill various viruses and cancer cells in the laboratory setting, and thus an intervention which could successfully improve NK activity would theoretically have the ability to improve health outcomes in disease process which involve NK sensitive organisms. However, a review of literature revealed that very few studies are available which document the effects of massage on immune functioning. Study Design and Participant Population: This quasi-experimental pilot study was done to determine the effect of the nursing back rub on stress and natural killer cell functioning in a small group of healthy female volunteers. Procedures: The relationship among stressful life experiences, stress, arousal, depression, and baseline natural killer cell function was examined. Twenty-four healthy females were recruited from an urban setting using advertisements and word of mouth. Informed consent was obtained and confidentiality was maintained. The subjects were exposed to no more risk than that experienced with a routine medical laboratory exam. The variables under investigation were measured as follows: exposure to negative life events - Life Events Scale (LES); Stress-Arousal - Stress-Arousal Check List (SACL); natural killer cell cytotoxicity - the standard 51Cr release natural killer cell assay. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depressed Mood Scale (CES-D) was used to screen for depressive symptoms in potential subjects. In addition, qualitative responses following the intervention were obtained from members of both groups using a standard interview. All of the instruments had acceptable reliability and validity. Findings: Natural killer (NK) cell function was evaluated using the standard chromium release assay. While this study consisted of a morning group (n = 11) and an afternoon group (n = 12), due to funding and methodological considerations, NK activity was only measured in subjects in the morning group (5 control, 6 massage). Results from these subjects only are reported here. Morning participants in the massage group had significantly decreased post stress levels compared to those in the control group. A significant decrease was found in systolic blood pressure for members in the morning massage group. Natural killer cell activity decreased somewhat for all morning participants from pre to post time points, possibly due to natural diurnal variation in NK activity. A trend for individuals in the massage group to have less decrease in NK activity was observed. Implications: The results of this pilot study suggest that a nursing back massage can decrease stress levels and systolic blood pressure. Further investigation is needed to determine the effect of back massage on natural killer cell activity.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:44:14Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:44:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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