2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148377
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Revision of the Strength Training Self-Efficacy Questionnaire
Abstract:
Revision of the Strength Training Self-Efficacy Questionnaire
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Bawel, Karen
P.I. Institution Name:University of Southern Indiana
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: Bandura’s construct of self-efficacy has been documented as a potential determinant of exercise behavior. Self-efficacy is task specific. A review of the literature failed to identify a suitable instrument to assess what older adults think about their ability to perform strength training exercised. The objective of this study was to continue the instrument development process on the Strength Training Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (Bawel & Keck, 1994.) Design: the original instrument was found to be reliable and valid instrument (Bawel & Keck, 1994). Modifications to the initial questionnaire included suggestions from the quantitative and qualitative findings from the original testing and recommendations of Bandura (1997). Older adults actors demonstrated each strength training exercise on the videotape. All participants were given an exercise handbook and a set of elastic bands to assess the different degree of resistance provided by each elastic band. The participants were asked to review the written and graphic illustrations, the videotape, and examine the elastic bands. After reviewing the materials, the participants were then asked to assess their ability to perform the strength training exercises and participate in a hypothetical home exercise behavior. Reliability and validity were assessed during two different times. The instrument was assessed at three times (initial, six, and twelve weeks) over twelve-weeks. Sample and Setting: A convenience sample of healthy community-dwelling adults (N = 86) aged 60 to 92 years volunteered to participate in the study. The participants were from cities located in Indiana. Older adults participating in senior group activity within the communities were approached. Inclusion criteria included older adults who are cognitively intact. Actual performance of the nine strength training exercises was not required. Findings: The revised Strength Self-Efficacy questionnaire consisted of 42 items non-redundant items using a 10 point semantic scale. Two bipolar adjectives used in this study were “Not sure” (0) to “Definitely sure” (10). The scale was located underneath each statement and the subjects were requested to circle the appropriate response to each statement. The item-total correlations ranged from .28 - .87. Cronbach’s alpha was used to estimate reliability at the three assessment times; 1) initial assessment, r = .98; 2) sixth week, r = .99; and 3) twelfth week, r = .99. The overall alpha coefficient of .98 suggested that all of the items were highly correlated and are measuring the same thing. Construct validity was supported. Conclusion: Findings demonstrated that the 10-point semantic scale provided greater variability and sensitivity in terms of “how confident” the subject was in doing each exercise. Significant findings suggest the revised Strength Training Self-Efficacy Questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument when assessing strength training among older adults. Implications: the Strength Training Self-Efficacy Questionnaire is a reliable and valid tool when assessing what older adults think about their ability to perform strength training exercised using elastic bands (Therabands).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRevision of the Strength Training Self-Efficacy Questionnaireen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148377-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Revision of the Strength Training Self-Efficacy Questionnaire</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bawel, Karen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Southern Indiana</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kbawel@usi.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Bandura&rsquo;s construct of self-efficacy has been documented as a potential determinant of exercise behavior. Self-efficacy is task specific. A review of the literature failed to identify a suitable instrument to assess what older adults think about their ability to perform strength training exercised. The objective of this study was to continue the instrument development process on the Strength Training Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (Bawel &amp; Keck, 1994.) Design: the original instrument was found to be reliable and valid instrument (Bawel &amp; Keck, 1994). Modifications to the initial questionnaire included suggestions from the quantitative and qualitative findings from the original testing and recommendations of Bandura (1997). Older adults actors demonstrated each strength training exercise on the videotape. All participants were given an exercise handbook and a set of elastic bands to assess the different degree of resistance provided by each elastic band. The participants were asked to review the written and graphic illustrations, the videotape, and examine the elastic bands. After reviewing the materials, the participants were then asked to assess their ability to perform the strength training exercises and participate in a hypothetical home exercise behavior. Reliability and validity were assessed during two different times. The instrument was assessed at three times (initial, six, and twelve weeks) over twelve-weeks. Sample and Setting: A convenience sample of healthy community-dwelling adults (N = 86) aged 60 to 92 years volunteered to participate in the study. The participants were from cities located in Indiana. Older adults participating in senior group activity within the communities were approached. Inclusion criteria included older adults who are cognitively intact. Actual performance of the nine strength training exercises was not required. Findings: The revised Strength Self-Efficacy questionnaire consisted of 42 items non-redundant items using a 10 point semantic scale. Two bipolar adjectives used in this study were &ldquo;Not sure&rdquo; (0) to &ldquo;Definitely sure&rdquo; (10). The scale was located underneath each statement and the subjects were requested to circle the appropriate response to each statement. The item-total correlations ranged from .28 - .87. Cronbach&rsquo;s alpha was used to estimate reliability at the three assessment times; 1) initial assessment, r = .98; 2) sixth week, r = .99; and 3) twelfth week, r = .99. The overall alpha coefficient of .98 suggested that all of the items were highly correlated and are measuring the same thing. Construct validity was supported. Conclusion: Findings demonstrated that the 10-point semantic scale provided greater variability and sensitivity in terms of &ldquo;how confident&rdquo; the subject was in doing each exercise. Significant findings suggest the revised Strength Training Self-Efficacy Questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument when assessing strength training among older adults. Implications: the Strength Training Self-Efficacy Questionnaire is a reliable and valid tool when assessing what older adults think about their ability to perform strength training exercised using elastic bands (Therabands).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:44:16Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:44:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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