2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148396
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Behaviors in a Tri-Ethnic Refugee Population
Abstract:
Health Behaviors in a Tri-Ethnic Refugee Population
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Barnes, Donelle M., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Texas Christian University
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: To describe the smoking, dietary and physical activity behaviors of U.S. refugees. Design: Descriptive, exploratory. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Adult Bosnian, Cuban and Iranian refugees; 30 adults total, 10 from each ethnic group with equal numbers of men and women. All had arrived in the U.S. within the previous five years; 2000-2001. Variables studied: Prior related behavior, perceived health status, perceived barriers, interpersonal influences (Pender, Murdaugh, & Parsons, 2002), and stage of change (Prochaska & DiClemente, 1984). Method: One face-to-face semi-structured interview in the refugees’ first language (Bosnian, Spanish and Farsi respectively), lasting approximately one hour. Responses were recorded on paper, data analyzed using SPSS software. Findings: Refugees engaged in physical activity five or more days a week. Some reported only mildly intensive activities, such as women doing housework. Most reported a high fat diet, low in fruits and vegetables. There were changes from previous diets in their country of origin. Few actually ate what they believed to be healthy, due to barriers of cost, availability, and interpersonal influences. Almost all were in the contemplation stage of change for diet and activity, and all were interested in programs designed for their ethnic group. The highest rate of smoking was among Bosnians, who were generally not interested in changing their behavior. Conclusions: Refugees lack some knowledge of healthy eating and physical activity patterns. All could identify barriers and all were interested in health improvement in those areas. Although all knew that smoking could harm them, few Bosnians were interested in smoking cessation. Implications: There are both similarities and differences between refugee ethnic groups in health promotion issues and readiness to change. Interventions are needed in the refugees’ first language, targeting culturally specific healthy eating, activity, and smoking behaviors for refugees. Funded by NIH: P30 NR05051
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Behaviors in a Tri-Ethnic Refugee Populationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148396-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Behaviors in a Tri-Ethnic Refugee Population</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Barnes, Donelle M., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Texas Christian University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">d.barnes@tcu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To describe the smoking, dietary and physical activity behaviors of U.S. refugees. Design: Descriptive, exploratory. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Adult Bosnian, Cuban and Iranian refugees; 30 adults total, 10 from each ethnic group with equal numbers of men and women. All had arrived in the U.S. within the previous five years; 2000-2001. Variables studied: Prior related behavior, perceived health status, perceived barriers, interpersonal influences (Pender, Murdaugh, &amp; Parsons, 2002), and stage of change (Prochaska &amp; DiClemente, 1984). Method: One face-to-face semi-structured interview in the refugees&rsquo; first language (Bosnian, Spanish and Farsi respectively), lasting approximately one hour. Responses were recorded on paper, data analyzed using SPSS software. Findings: Refugees engaged in physical activity five or more days a week. Some reported only mildly intensive activities, such as women doing housework. Most reported a high fat diet, low in fruits and vegetables. There were changes from previous diets in their country of origin. Few actually ate what they believed to be healthy, due to barriers of cost, availability, and interpersonal influences. Almost all were in the contemplation stage of change for diet and activity, and all were interested in programs designed for their ethnic group. The highest rate of smoking was among Bosnians, who were generally not interested in changing their behavior. Conclusions: Refugees lack some knowledge of healthy eating and physical activity patterns. All could identify barriers and all were interested in health improvement in those areas. Although all knew that smoking could harm them, few Bosnians were interested in smoking cessation. Implications: There are both similarities and differences between refugee ethnic groups in health promotion issues and readiness to change. Interventions are needed in the refugees&rsquo; first language, targeting culturally specific healthy eating, activity, and smoking behaviors for refugees. Funded by NIH: P30 NR05051</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:44:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:44:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.