2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148422
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychosocial Adjustment After Radiation Therapy
Abstract:
Psychosocial Adjustment After Radiation Therapy
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Mazanec, Susan R., MSN, RN, AOCN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Doctoral Student
[Scientific Session Presentation] The immediate post-radiation treatment transition is a critical period for patients and is characterized by persistent treatment side effects, fatigue, anxiety, uncertainty and emotional distress.  This occurs at a time when the intense daily contact with the health care team during their weeks of radiation treatment ends abruptly at the completion of treatment.  The transition is an opportunity for nurses to identify and intervene with patients who are at high risk for physical, emotional and social problems during the immediate post-treatment phase.  Despite its importance, the post-radiation treatment transition is rarely described in the literature and there are few studies of factors that influence psychosocial adjustment. The purpose of this study is to describe the patient?s experience post-radiation and to examine predictors of psychosocial adjustment during the immediate post-radiation treatment transition in patients with breast, lung, and prostate cancer who have completed their primary treatment for their cancer.  Consistent with Lazarus and Folkman?s stress, appraisal and coping theory, it is posited that cognitive appraisal of health during the transition is pivotal in determining psychosocial adjustment.This study, which will be completed in June 2009, is using a predictive correlational design to test the relationship between stress appraisal and the outcome variable, psychosocial adjustment.  To date, 78 patients have enrolled.  Two weeks prior to the completion of treatment, subjects complete surveys to assess their stress appraisal, uncertainty, symptom distress, social support, and efficacy for coping.  Subjects complete the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale approximately one-month after radiation treatment is complete.  The analyses will consist of descriptive statistics and a series of hierarchical multiple regressions.This research will contribute to our understanding of cognitive appraisal and its importance during this transition to post-treatment survivorship and will provide information for the development of assessment and intervention tools for the healthcare team.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychosocial Adjustment After Radiation Therapyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148422-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Psychosocial Adjustment After Radiation Therapy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mazanec, Susan R., MSN, RN, AOCN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">susan.mazanec@case.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific Session Presentation] The immediate post-radiation treatment transition is a critical period for patients and is characterized by persistent treatment side effects, fatigue, anxiety, uncertainty and emotional distress.&nbsp; This occurs at a time when the intense daily contact with the health care team during their weeks of radiation treatment ends abruptly at the completion of treatment.&nbsp; The transition is an opportunity for nurses to identify and intervene with patients who are at high risk for physical, emotional and social problems during the immediate post-treatment phase.&nbsp; Despite its importance, the post-radiation treatment transition is rarely described in the literature and there are few studies of factors that influence psychosocial adjustment. The purpose of this study is to describe the patient?s experience post-radiation and to examine predictors of psychosocial adjustment during the immediate post-radiation treatment transition in patients with breast, lung, and prostate cancer who have completed their primary treatment for their cancer.&nbsp; Consistent with Lazarus and Folkman?s stress, appraisal and coping theory, it is posited that cognitive appraisal of health during the transition is pivotal in determining psychosocial adjustment.This study, which will be completed in June 2009, is using a predictive correlational design to test the relationship between stress appraisal and the outcome variable, psychosocial adjustment.&nbsp; To date, 78 patients have enrolled.&nbsp; Two weeks prior to the completion of treatment, subjects complete surveys to assess their stress appraisal, uncertainty, symptom distress, social support, and efficacy for coping.&nbsp; Subjects complete the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale approximately one-month after radiation treatment is complete.&nbsp; The analyses will consist of descriptive statistics and a series of hierarchical multiple regressions.This research will contribute to our understanding of cognitive appraisal and its importance during this transition to post-treatment survivorship and will provide information for the development of assessment and intervention tools for the healthcare team.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:44:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:44:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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