A Gender-Specific "Abstinence Plus" HIV-Prevention Intervention for Urban Adolescent Girls

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148432
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Gender-Specific "Abstinence Plus" HIV-Prevention Intervention for Urban Adolescent Girls
Abstract:
A Gender-Specific "Abstinence Plus" HIV-Prevention Intervention for Urban Adolescent Girls
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Morrison-Beedy, Dianne, PhD, RN, WHNP-BC, FNAP, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Rochester
Title:Professor and Endowed Chair for Nursing Science
Co-Authors:Michael P. Carey, PhD; Xin Tu, PhD
[Scientific Session Presentation] Background: Worldwide nearly 90% of heterosexually-acquired adolescent HIV infections occur in females, thus prevention efforts should target girls before they become sexually active. Interventions that both delay sexual initiation and prepare girls for safer behaviors once they become sexually active are essential yet few scientifically-rigorous gender-specific interventions have been developed and tested.Purpose:  To assess the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of an abstinence ?plus? gender specific HIV prevention intervention for urban girls ages 14-19. Methods: This randomized controlled design with two intervention arms piloted a manualized intervention guided by the information-motivation-behavioral skills (IMB) model. We recruited 54 urban girls (78% African American, M age = 15.1 yrs) from an impoverished urban community. Girls were randomized to a gender-specific comprehensive ?abstinence plus? intervention or structurally equivalent health promotion control group. Four 2-hour sessions were designed to increase resilience, maintain abstinence, and delay sexual debut, as well as increase knowledge, and improve motivation to reduce risk and behavioral skills. These small groups utilized motivational enhancement strategies and were guided by two trained female facilitators. Results: In the 3-month follow-up effect sizes indicated that girls in the intervention group improved: HIV prevention knowledge (d = .93), resilience (d = .67), condom attitudes (d = .57), sex motives (d = .4), social norms (d = .37), parental caring and responsiveness (ds = .22-.28), and behavioral intentions for lower risk behaviors (d = .27), as compared to the control group; they were also less likely to engage in any drug use (d = .39).Implications: This study demonstrates the feasibility of conducting a gender-specific HIV prevention intervention for abstinent urban girls within community settings. The results indicate that the theoretical antecedents of risk behavior were improved as well as concurrent risk behavior providing strong evidence for a test of the intervention in a full-scale trial.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Gender-Specific "Abstinence Plus" HIV-Prevention Intervention for Urban Adolescent Girlsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148432-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Gender-Specific &quot;Abstinence Plus&quot; HIV-Prevention Intervention for Urban Adolescent Girls</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Morrison-Beedy, Dianne, PhD, RN, WHNP-BC, FNAP, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Rochester</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor and Endowed Chair for Nursing Science</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Dianne_Morrison-Beedy@urmc.rochester.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Michael P. Carey, PhD; Xin Tu, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific Session Presentation] Background: Worldwide nearly 90% of heterosexually-acquired adolescent HIV infections occur in females, thus prevention efforts should target girls before they become sexually active. Interventions that both delay sexual initiation and prepare girls for safer behaviors once they become sexually active are essential yet few scientifically-rigorous gender-specific interventions have been developed and tested.Purpose:&nbsp; To assess the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of an abstinence ?plus? gender specific HIV prevention intervention for urban girls ages 14-19. Methods: This randomized controlled design with two intervention arms piloted a manualized intervention guided by the information-motivation-behavioral skills (IMB) model. We recruited 54 urban girls (78% African American, M age = 15.1 yrs) from an impoverished urban community. Girls were randomized to a gender-specific comprehensive ?abstinence plus? intervention or structurally equivalent health promotion control group. Four 2-hour sessions were designed to increase resilience, maintain abstinence, and delay sexual debut, as well as increase knowledge, and improve motivation to reduce risk and behavioral skills. These small groups utilized motivational enhancement strategies and were guided by two trained female facilitators. Results: In the 3-month follow-up effect sizes indicated that girls in the intervention group improved: HIV prevention knowledge (d = .93), resilience (d = .67), condom attitudes (d = .57), sex motives (d = .4), social norms (d = .37), parental caring and responsiveness (ds = .22-.28), and behavioral intentions for lower risk behaviors (d = .27), as compared to the control group; they were also less likely to engage in any drug use (d = .39).Implications: This study demonstrates the feasibility of conducting a gender-specific HIV prevention intervention for abstinent urban girls within community settings. The results indicate that the theoretical antecedents of risk behavior were improved as well as concurrent risk behavior providing strong evidence for a test of the intervention in a full-scale trial.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:45:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:45:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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