Culturally Appropriate Interventions to Decrease Preterm Birth in African-American Adolescents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148445
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Culturally Appropriate Interventions to Decrease Preterm Birth in African-American Adolescents
Abstract:
Culturally Appropriate Interventions to Decrease Preterm Birth in African-American Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Pirkle, L. Darlene, RNC, MSN, CCE, CLC
P.I. Institution Name:Valdosta State University
Title:Ms.
[Evidence-based Practice Session Presentation] African American women had a threefold higher rate of birth at 20 to 34 weeks of gestation than Caucasian women (relative risk, 2.99; 95% CI, 2.89 to 3.08), and a nearly fourfold higher risk for extreme preterm birth, defined as 20-28 weeks of gestation. Compared with Caucasian women, the relative risk that an African American woman would give birth to an extremely premature infant was 3.71 (95% CI, 3.43 to 4.00) (Kistka, 2008). The risk of poor birth outcomes is greatest among the youngest mothers (aged 15 years and under). Continued work is needed to educate women, especially the young women, about the need to initiate prenatal care early in pregnancy.  The goal of US Healthy People 2010 (HP2010)(CDC, 2008) Objective 16 is to decrease preterm birth to 7.6% Evaluation criteria will include the decrease of preterm births with early identification by health care providers of high risk patients and increased access to quality and comprehensive prenatal care. Measurement of outcome criteria will continue to be monitored by (PRAMS) Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System which will document statistics regarding prenatal care, preterm birth, etc. which all states require on birth certificate applications. Babies born to mothers who received inadequate prenatal care are three times more likely to be born at low birth weight, premature, and five times more likely to die, than those whose mothers received prenatal care (CDC, 2008).  This paper will discuss culturally-specific and evidenced-based practice which must be provided to African American adolescents in order to meet the HP 2010 (CDC, 2008) goals.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCulturally Appropriate Interventions to Decrease Preterm Birth in African-American Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148445-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Culturally Appropriate Interventions to Decrease Preterm Birth in African-American Adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pirkle, L. Darlene, RNC, MSN, CCE, CLC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Valdosta State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Ms.</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lpirkle@valdosta.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based Practice Session Presentation] African American women had a threefold higher rate of birth at 20 to 34 weeks of gestation than Caucasian women (relative risk, 2.99; 95% CI, 2.89 to 3.08), and a nearly fourfold higher risk for extreme preterm birth, defined as 20-28 weeks of gestation. Compared with Caucasian women, the relative risk that an African American woman would give birth to an extremely premature infant was 3.71 (95% CI, 3.43 to 4.00) (Kistka, 2008). The risk of poor birth outcomes is greatest among the youngest mothers (aged 15 years and under). Continued work is needed to educate women, especially the young women, about the need to initiate prenatal care early in pregnancy.&nbsp;&nbsp;The goal of US Healthy People 2010 (HP2010)(CDC, 2008) Objective 16 is to decrease preterm birth to 7.6% Evaluation criteria will include the decrease of preterm births with early identification by health care providers of high risk patients and increased access to quality and comprehensive prenatal care. Measurement of outcome criteria will continue to be monitored by (PRAMS) Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System which will document statistics regarding prenatal care, preterm birth, etc. which all states require on birth certificate applications. Babies born to mothers who received inadequate prenatal care are three times more likely to be born at low birth weight, premature, and five times more likely to die, than those whose mothers received prenatal care (CDC, 2008). &nbsp;This paper will discuss culturally-specific and evidenced-based practice which must be provided to African American adolescents in order to meet the HP 2010 (CDC, 2008) goals.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:45:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:45:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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