Caring Phenomena of Practicing Nurses: Knowing, Patience, and Courage

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148450
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Caring Phenomena of Practicing Nurses: Knowing, Patience, and Courage
Abstract:
Caring Phenomena of Practicing Nurses: Knowing, Patience, and Courage
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Pross, Elizabeth, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Florida Atlantic University
Co-Authors:Nancy S. Hilton, RN, MN; Anne Boykin, PhD, RN; Jesse Gabuat, MSN, RN
[Scientific Session Presentation] Theoretical Framework. All persons are caring and are continually growing in ability to express caring (Mayeroff, 1972). It is important to come to know nursing colleagues as caring in order to nurture and support colleagues in living caring in nursing practice (Boykin & Schoenhofer, 2001). Purpose. Researchers studied caring phenomena among practicing nurses in an organization prior to a planned intervention in which an organization will adopt caring values and nursing departments adopt Nursing as Caring theory. The organization will be studied again after a planned intervention to determine specific outcomes. This current study builds on earlier research of Nursing as Caring in a telemetry unit and emergency department (Boykin, Schoenhofer, et. al. & Boykin, Bulfin S, et. al., 2004) Design and Methods. In a nonexperimental correlational design, Nkongho?s Caring Ability Inventorys (CAI) were completed by 131 practicing nurses at one for-profit health care organization located in a southeastern United States city. All nurses at this organization were invited to be participants. Descriptive statistics and Pearson?s correlations were used to analyze data. Results. With Cronback?s alphas of .77, .73 and .65 for the subscales and .82 for CAI total, results showed highest scores for subscale Knowing, followed by Patience and then Courage. Pearson correlations revealed statistical significance with the three subscales. As Knowing increased so did Patience. Interestingly, as Knowing or Patience increased, Courage decreased. Extant literature revealed while courage in nursing practice is essential and significant, it?s mostly invisible in practice and in the literature (Clancy, 2003; Day 2007; Spence & Smythe, 2007; & Walston 2003). Conclusions and Relevance. This study confirmed practicing nurses were able to reveal caring abilities prior to an intervention introducing caring values and theory. Potentially, findings in this study will guide caring theory in nursing practice, education, and theory. ReferencesBoykin A & Schoenhofer S (2001) Nursing as Caring. A Model for Transforming Practice. Jones & Bartlett, Sudbury, Ma. Boykin A, Schoenhofer S, Smith N, & St Jean J, & Aleman D (2003) Transforming practice using a caring-based model. Nursing Administration Quarterly 27, 223-230. Boykin A, Bulfin S, Baldwin J, & Southern R  (2004) Transforming care in the emergency department. Topics Emergency Medicine 26, 331-36. Clancy T (2003) Courage and today?s nurse leaders. Nursing Administration Quarterly 27, 128-132. Day L (2007) Courage as a virtue necessary to good nursing practice. American Journal of Critical Care 16, 613-616.Mayeroff M (1972) On caring. Harper and Row Publishers, New York. Spence D & Smythe L (2007) Courage as integral to advancing nursing practice. Nursing Praxis in New Zealand 23, 43-55. Walston S (2003) Courage and caring: Step up to your next level of nursing excellence. Patient Care Management 19, 4-6.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCaring Phenomena of Practicing Nurses: Knowing, Patience, and Courageen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148450-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Caring Phenomena of Practicing Nurses: Knowing, Patience, and Courage</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pross, Elizabeth, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Florida Atlantic University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">epross@fau.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nancy S. Hilton, RN, MN; Anne Boykin, PhD, RN; Jesse Gabuat, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific Session Presentation] Theoretical Framework. All persons are caring and are continually growing in ability to express caring (Mayeroff, 1972). It is important to come to know nursing colleagues as caring in order to nurture and support colleagues in living caring in nursing practice (Boykin &amp; Schoenhofer, 2001). Purpose. Researchers studied caring phenomena among practicing nurses in an organization prior to&nbsp;a planned intervention in which an organization will adopt caring values and nursing departments adopt Nursing as Caring theory. The organization will be studied again after&nbsp;a planned intervention to determine specific outcomes. This current study builds on earlier research of Nursing as Caring in a telemetry unit and emergency department (Boykin, Schoenhofer, et. al. &amp; Boykin, Bulfin S, et. al., 2004) Design and Methods. In a nonexperimental correlational design, Nkongho?s Caring Ability Inventorys (CAI) were completed by 131 practicing nurses at one for-profit health care organization located in a southeastern United States city. All nurses at this organization were invited to be participants. Descriptive statistics and Pearson?s correlations were used to analyze data. Results. With Cronback?s alphas of .77, .73 and .65 for the subscales and .82 for CAI total, results showed highest scores for subscale Knowing, followed by Patience and then Courage. Pearson correlations revealed statistical significance with the three subscales. As Knowing increased so did Patience. Interestingly, as Knowing or Patience increased, Courage decreased. Extant literature revealed while courage in nursing practice is essential and significant, it?s mostly invisible in practice and in the literature (Clancy, 2003; Day 2007; Spence &amp; Smythe, 2007; &amp; Walston 2003). Conclusions and Relevance. This study confirmed practicing nurses were able to reveal caring abilities prior to an intervention introducing caring values and theory. Potentially, findings in this study will guide caring theory in nursing practice, education, and theory. ReferencesBoykin A &amp; Schoenhofer S (2001) Nursing as Caring. A Model for Transforming Practice. Jones &amp; Bartlett, Sudbury, Ma. Boykin A, Schoenhofer S, Smith N, &amp; St Jean J, &amp; Aleman D (2003) Transforming practice using a caring-based model. Nursing Administration Quarterly 27, 223-230. Boykin A, Bulfin S, Baldwin J, &amp; Southern R&nbsp; (2004) Transforming care in the emergency department. Topics Emergency Medicine 26, 331-36. Clancy T (2003) Courage and today?s nurse leaders. Nursing Administration Quarterly 27, 128-132. Day L (2007) Courage as a virtue necessary to good nursing practice. American Journal of Critical Care 16, 613-616.Mayeroff M (1972) On caring. Harper and Row Publishers, New York. Spence D &amp; Smythe L (2007) Courage as integral to advancing nursing practice. Nursing Praxis in New Zealand 23, 43-55. Walston S (2003) Courage and caring: Step up to your next level of nursing excellence. Patient Care Management 19, 4-6.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:45:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:45:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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