Use of Creative Arts as Complementary Therapy by Rural Women Coping with Chronic Illness

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148476
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Use of Creative Arts as Complementary Therapy by Rural Women Coping with Chronic Illness
Abstract:
Use of Creative Arts as Complementary Therapy by Rural Women Coping with Chronic Illness
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Worth, Catherine G.
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University
Title:Nursing Student
[Invited Poster or Paper Session] The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of art-making as a complementary therapy by rural women coping with chronic illness. The data for this secondary analysis was from the Women to Women Project being conducted at the Montana State University College of Nursing. Participants in the study were 122 rural women diagnosed with a chronic illness living in isolated areas of Montana, Idaho, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming, Nebraska, Washington and Oregon, residing on a ranch, farm or in a small town at least 25 miles from a population center of 12,500 or more people. Eleven weeks of verbatim messages posted to an asynchronous web-based chat room were analyzed to identify and interpret common and emerging themes within their discussions about the role of art-making as a complementary therapy. Their messages included self-reported effects of art-making on pain management and quality of life. Quilting, sewing and knitting were the predominant media referenced, and participants strongly implied that their creative output, whether the expression of a previously learned skill or a practice established after the onset of chronic illness, contributed to reduced pain and increased overall well-being. The art-making in this study was a spontaneous activity that was consciously or subconsciously linked with improved well-being in the face of chronic illness. The most notable findings were references to pain and pain relief in proximity to references regarding art-making. Pain relief and increased quality of life associated with the practice of creative arts warrant further study and will facilitate the development of art interventions that could benefit individuals coping with the adverse effects of chronic illness. The next phase of this study is to investigate the effect of art-making interventions on the self-reported pain experienced by rural individuals with chronic illnesses.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUse of Creative Arts as Complementary Therapy by Rural Women Coping with Chronic Illnessen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148476-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Use of Creative Arts as Complementary Therapy by Rural Women Coping with Chronic Illness</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Worth, Catherine G.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kworth426@gmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Invited Poster or Paper Session] The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of art-making as a complementary therapy by rural women coping with chronic illness. The data for this secondary analysis was from the Women to Women Project being conducted at the Montana State University College of Nursing. Participants in the study were 122 rural women diagnosed with a chronic illness living in isolated areas of Montana, Idaho, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming, Nebraska, Washington and Oregon, residing on a ranch, farm or in a small town at least 25 miles from a population center of 12,500 or more people. Eleven weeks of verbatim messages posted to an asynchronous web-based chat room were analyzed to identify and interpret common and emerging themes within their discussions about the role of art-making as a complementary therapy. Their messages included self-reported effects of art-making on pain management and quality of life. Quilting, sewing and knitting were the predominant media referenced, and participants strongly implied that their creative output, whether the expression of a previously learned skill or a practice established after the onset of chronic illness, contributed to reduced pain and increased overall well-being. The art-making in this study was a spontaneous activity that was consciously or subconsciously linked with improved well-being in the face of chronic illness. The most notable findings were references to pain and pain relief in proximity to references regarding art-making. Pain relief and increased quality of life associated with the practice of creative arts warrant further study and will facilitate the development of art interventions that could benefit individuals coping with the adverse effects of chronic illness. The next phase of this study is to investigate the effect of art-making interventions on the self-reported pain experienced by rural individuals with chronic illnesses.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:45:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:45:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.