2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148480
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parental roles in the family with an asthmatic child
Abstract:
Parental roles in the family with an asthmatic child
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Vollmer, William, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Center for Health Research, Kaiser Permanente, NW Region
Title:Investigator
The most common chronic childhood illness is asthma, with a

prevalence between 10-15 percent of children, 80 percent of whom

have their first symptoms by age five. Both incidence of

childhood asthma and the rate of hospitalizations due to asthma

have risen in recent years. The course of asthma is long-term

and often unpredictable. Assisting the family to manage the

child's illness and to minimize the impact of a child with asthma

on the rest of the family is an important goal for nursing care.

Most research on childhood asthma and the family focuses on the

mother. A major research gap pertains to the father's

involvement in caregiving and the impact of his involvement on

the family's function. We hypothesize that the extent and nature

of the father's involvement will be associated with impact of the

child's asthma on the family. The aims of this analysis are to

1) examine caregiver roles of mother and father; 2) identify

their reactions to the caregiving experience; 3) explore the

relationship between the mother's and father's perceptions of

rewards of care-giving; and 4) determine the degree to which the

extent and nature of the father's involvement is associated with

impact of the child's asthma on the family. Subjects are 228

families with asthmatic children aged 4-14, enrolled in a large

HMO, and participating in a randomized controlled clinical trial

which compares three approaches to the management of childhood

asthma - usual care; Open Airways classes for parents and child;

and a 24-hour advice nurse. Baseline data for the clinical trial

included questions on caregiving involvement of family members,

Impact on the Family Scale, and parental perceptions of

caregiving. Measures were based on previously tested and

validated instruments. A quarter of fathers are frequently

involved in caregiving activities, 31 percent sometimes, 27

percent rarely, and only 16 percent never involved. Eighty

percent of mothers are frequently involved, 15 percent sometimes

involved, and only 4 percent rarely or never involved. There was

no significant difference between scores of mothers and fathers

on the rewards of caregiving scale, although fathers reported

significantly less stress associated with their caregiving role

than did mothers. Association of parental patterns and degree of

involvement in caregiving with family function measures will be

presented. Findings from this study have implications for

delivery of nursing care since nurses play a key role in patient

and family assessment and in planning and implementing

intervention strategies for use by the family.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParental roles in the family with an asthmatic childen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148480-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parental roles in the family with an asthmatic child</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vollmer, William, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Center for Health Research, Kaiser Permanente, NW Region</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Investigator</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The most common chronic childhood illness is asthma, with a<br/><br/>prevalence between 10-15 percent of children, 80 percent of whom<br/><br/>have their first symptoms by age five. Both incidence of<br/><br/>childhood asthma and the rate of hospitalizations due to asthma<br/><br/>have risen in recent years. The course of asthma is long-term<br/><br/>and often unpredictable. Assisting the family to manage the<br/><br/>child's illness and to minimize the impact of a child with asthma<br/><br/>on the rest of the family is an important goal for nursing care.<br/><br/>Most research on childhood asthma and the family focuses on the<br/><br/>mother. A major research gap pertains to the father's<br/><br/>involvement in caregiving and the impact of his involvement on<br/><br/>the family's function. We hypothesize that the extent and nature<br/><br/>of the father's involvement will be associated with impact of the<br/><br/>child's asthma on the family. The aims of this analysis are to<br/><br/>1) examine caregiver roles of mother and father; 2) identify<br/><br/>their reactions to the caregiving experience; 3) explore the<br/><br/>relationship between the mother's and father's perceptions of<br/><br/>rewards of care-giving; and 4) determine the degree to which the<br/><br/>extent and nature of the father's involvement is associated with<br/><br/>impact of the child's asthma on the family. Subjects are 228<br/><br/>families with asthmatic children aged 4-14, enrolled in a large<br/><br/>HMO, and participating in a randomized controlled clinical trial<br/><br/>which compares three approaches to the management of childhood<br/><br/>asthma - usual care; Open Airways classes for parents and child;<br/><br/>and a 24-hour advice nurse. Baseline data for the clinical trial<br/><br/>included questions on caregiving involvement of family members,<br/><br/>Impact on the Family Scale, and parental perceptions of<br/><br/>caregiving. Measures were based on previously tested and<br/><br/>validated instruments. A quarter of fathers are frequently<br/><br/>involved in caregiving activities, 31 percent sometimes, 27<br/><br/>percent rarely, and only 16 percent never involved. Eighty<br/><br/>percent of mothers are frequently involved, 15 percent sometimes<br/><br/>involved, and only 4 percent rarely or never involved. There was<br/><br/>no significant difference between scores of mothers and fathers<br/><br/>on the rewards of caregiving scale, although fathers reported<br/><br/>significantly less stress associated with their caregiving role<br/><br/>than did mothers. Association of parental patterns and degree of<br/><br/>involvement in caregiving with family function measures will be<br/><br/>presented. Findings from this study have implications for<br/><br/>delivery of nursing care since nurses play a key role in patient<br/><br/>and family assessment and in planning and implementing<br/><br/>intervention strategies for use by the family.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:45:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:45:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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