Women's decision making about contraception: A longitudinal study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148481
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women's decision making about contraception: A longitudinal study
Abstract:
Women's decision making about contraception: A longitudinal study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Hawkins, Joellen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Boston College School of Nursing
Title:Professor
Women's patterns of decision making about contraception over time reflect changing roles, relationships, lifestyles, other health seeking behaviors or health concerns, and reveal deliberate risk-taking behaviors. This study was designed to explore the patterns of fertility regulation seeking behaviors of a sample of women who seek professional assistance for decision making and procuring contraception. Specific questions asked of the data were: Do the patterns of method use reflect those in the literature? Do women choose more effective methods when they have experienced an unwanted pregnancy? Do women use the methods they decide on with a health care professional?



Studies reported in the literature vary in the patterns they describe. In one study, the investigator concluded that decision making is linear, progressing from least to most effective methods. Several large surveys of women's contraceptive use have been conducted; four cycles of the National Survey of Family Growth and annual cycles of the Ortho Birth Control study have yielded aggregate data on women's current method use from which predictions of method use by United States women have been generated. No studies have employed a longitudinal approach over a period of greater than one year.



The design for this investigation was ex post facto. The procedure employed was a retrospective record review of the patterns of fertility regulation exhibited by a sample of women using the services of a private nonprofit agency that offers family planning and gynecologic services. The sample of 800 cases over a 15 year period was randomly drawn from the files and represents the ethnic groups in the population and women's fertility lifespan.



Analysis with univariate and bivariate descriptive statistics, correlation coefficients, t-tests, and factor analysis supported the diversity of women's choices and the frequency of method change. Method efficacy and unintended pregnancy have little relation to choices or changes. The decision to use a particular method is a temporary decision. The methods women decide on with the assistance of a health care professional are not necessarily the methods they will use.



These findings have important implications for nurses who work with clients in this decision making process. Tracking the patterns of choosing and changing exhibited in fertility regulation is an important first step to understanding and supporting women as they make these decisions. Women are attempting to manipulate the limited methods of contraception to fit their particular lifestyles, so that they may fully express their sexuality without creating encumbrances upon their other life choices.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen's decision making about contraception: A longitudinal studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148481-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women's decision making about contraception: A longitudinal study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hawkins, Joellen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Boston College School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hawkinsj@bc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Women's patterns of decision making about contraception over time reflect changing roles, relationships, lifestyles, other health seeking behaviors or health concerns, and reveal deliberate risk-taking behaviors. This study was designed to explore the patterns of fertility regulation seeking behaviors of a sample of women who seek professional assistance for decision making and procuring contraception. Specific questions asked of the data were: Do the patterns of method use reflect those in the literature? Do women choose more effective methods when they have experienced an unwanted pregnancy? Do women use the methods they decide on with a health care professional?<br/><br/><br/><br/>Studies reported in the literature vary in the patterns they describe. In one study, the investigator concluded that decision making is linear, progressing from least to most effective methods. Several large surveys of women's contraceptive use have been conducted; four cycles of the National Survey of Family Growth and annual cycles of the Ortho Birth Control study have yielded aggregate data on women's current method use from which predictions of method use by United States women have been generated. No studies have employed a longitudinal approach over a period of greater than one year.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The design for this investigation was ex post facto. The procedure employed was a retrospective record review of the patterns of fertility regulation exhibited by a sample of women using the services of a private nonprofit agency that offers family planning and gynecologic services. The sample of 800 cases over a 15 year period was randomly drawn from the files and represents the ethnic groups in the population and women's fertility lifespan.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Analysis with univariate and bivariate descriptive statistics, correlation coefficients, t-tests, and factor analysis supported the diversity of women's choices and the frequency of method change. Method efficacy and unintended pregnancy have little relation to choices or changes. The decision to use a particular method is a temporary decision. The methods women decide on with the assistance of a health care professional are not necessarily the methods they will use.<br/><br/><br/><br/>These findings have important implications for nurses who work with clients in this decision making process. Tracking the patterns of choosing and changing exhibited in fertility regulation is an important first step to understanding and supporting women as they make these decisions. Women are attempting to manipulate the limited methods of contraception to fit their particular lifestyles, so that they may fully express their sexuality without creating encumbrances upon their other life choices.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:45:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:45:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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