The relationship of maternal self-concept, depressive symptoms, and social support to the perception of maternal role attainment and premature infant health outcomes (DISS)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148482
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The relationship of maternal self-concept, depressive symptoms, and social support to the perception of maternal role attainment and premature infant health outcomes (DISS)
Abstract:
The relationship of maternal self-concept, depressive symptoms, and social support to the perception of maternal role attainment and premature infant health outcomes (DISS)
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Carlson, Karen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico
Sixty-two mothers of prematurely born infants were studied to determine the relative contributions of three selected maternal characteristics (self-concept, self-reported depressive symptoms, and perceived social support) to subjective feelings of maternal role attainment and infant health outcomes at one month post-discharge from NICU. The mothers were English speaking, 16 years of age or older, and lived within a 75 mile radius of the metropolitan area. Their infants were singleton births, of 37 weeks gestational age or less, with birthweights of >= 1000 grams and <2500 grams, a history of Grade II or less intraventricular hemorrhage, no known physical or neurological congenital defects, and did not require any high technology home care upon hospital discharge.



The mothers were 40.3 percent primiparous, 59.7 percent multiparous, English speaking, 16 years of age or older, predominantly White (54.8 percent) and Hispanic (35.5 percent), married (72.6 percent), from the lower three socioeconomic stratifications (72.6 percent) as classified by Hollingshead (1977), and lived within a 75 mile radius of the metropolitan area. Their infants were singleton births, of 37 weeks gestational age or less (M=33.4 weeks), with birth weights of >1000 grams and <2500 grams (M=1857 grams), a history of Grade II or less intraventricular hemorrhage, no known physical or neurological congenital defects, and did not require any high technology home care upon discharge from the hospital.



Measurement of the predictor variables used the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale (Fitts, 1965, alpha .93), the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (Radloff, 1977, alpha .89), and the Arizona Social Support Interview Schedule (Barrera, 1981, alpha .85). At the post-discharge home visits mothers completed the Gratification in the Mothering Role Scale (Russell, 1974, alpha .70), the Maternal Self-Report Inventory (Shea and Tronick, 1988, alpha .81), and a questionnaire about the number of infant rehospitalizations and the number of unscheduled acute care visits. Infants were also weighed and measured during the home visit.



Multiple regression statistics were utilized to analyze the data. Ten mothers (16.l%) had self-concept scores below the majority of the population. Forty-two mothers (67.7%) demonstrated high depressive symptoms (scores > 16). Perceived number of social support persons ranged from two to 20. Self-concept contributed 28 percent of the variance in feelings of maternal role attainment as measured by the Maternal Self-Report Inventory (Rsub2=28, F=24.60, p=.0001). The relationship of the other maternal characteristics to the outcome variables were statistically non-significant (p<=.05). Data were also examined through use of graphic residual analysis to determine the potential value of the addition of other variables (maternal age, parity, type of delivery, ethnicity, SES, marital status, number of hours the mother is employed, infant's gestational age, length of infant hospitalization, and infant risk status) to the regression equation for augmentation of the model.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe relationship of maternal self-concept, depressive symptoms, and social support to the perception of maternal role attainment and premature infant health outcomes (DISS)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148482-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The relationship of maternal self-concept, depressive symptoms, and social support to the perception of maternal role attainment and premature infant health outcomes (DISS)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Carlson, Karen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">karenc@unm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Sixty-two mothers of prematurely born infants were studied to determine the relative contributions of three selected maternal characteristics (self-concept, self-reported depressive symptoms, and perceived social support) to subjective feelings of maternal role attainment and infant health outcomes at one month post-discharge from NICU. The mothers were English speaking, 16 years of age or older, and lived within a 75 mile radius of the metropolitan area. Their infants were singleton births, of 37 weeks gestational age or less, with birthweights of &gt;= 1000 grams and &lt;2500 grams, a history of Grade II or less intraventricular hemorrhage, no known physical or neurological congenital defects, and did not require any high technology home care upon hospital discharge.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The mothers were 40.3 percent primiparous, 59.7 percent multiparous, English speaking, 16 years of age or older, predominantly White (54.8 percent) and Hispanic (35.5 percent), married (72.6 percent), from the lower three socioeconomic stratifications (72.6 percent) as classified by Hollingshead (1977), and lived within a 75 mile radius of the metropolitan area. Their infants were singleton births, of 37 weeks gestational age or less (M=33.4 weeks), with birth weights of &gt;1000 grams and &lt;2500 grams (M=1857 grams), a history of Grade II or less intraventricular hemorrhage, no known physical or neurological congenital defects, and did not require any high technology home care upon discharge from the hospital.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Measurement of the predictor variables used the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale (Fitts, 1965, alpha .93), the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (Radloff, 1977, alpha .89), and the Arizona Social Support Interview Schedule (Barrera, 1981, alpha .85). At the post-discharge home visits mothers completed the Gratification in the Mothering Role Scale (Russell, 1974, alpha .70), the Maternal Self-Report Inventory (Shea and Tronick, 1988, alpha .81), and a questionnaire about the number of infant rehospitalizations and the number of unscheduled acute care visits. Infants were also weighed and measured during the home visit.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Multiple regression statistics were utilized to analyze the data. Ten mothers (16.l%) had self-concept scores below the majority of the population. Forty-two mothers (67.7%) demonstrated high depressive symptoms (scores &gt; 16). Perceived number of social support persons ranged from two to 20. Self-concept contributed 28 percent of the variance in feelings of maternal role attainment as measured by the Maternal Self-Report Inventory (Rsub2=28, F=24.60, p=.0001). The relationship of the other maternal characteristics to the outcome variables were statistically non-significant (p&lt;=.05). Data were also examined through use of graphic residual analysis to determine the potential value of the addition of other variables (maternal age, parity, type of delivery, ethnicity, SES, marital status, number of hours the mother is employed, infant's gestational age, length of infant hospitalization, and infant risk status) to the regression equation for augmentation of the model.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:45:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:45:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.