2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148483
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The relationship of creativity and health in the elderly
Author(s):
Alligood, Martha Raile
Author Details:
Alligood, Martha, PhD, Professor, University of Tennessee, email: malligoo@utk.edu
Abstract:
With the rising number of elderly and the high cost of long term care, maintaining health and independent living among the elderly becomes increasingly important. Since health habits which contribute to health in the general population have been found to no longer predict longevity after the age of 65, there is need to study the elderly in order to identify factors which do contribute to their health and well-being.

This study tested the research hypothesis, creativity is positively related to health among the elderly. Rogers (1986) conceptual system provided the framework to guide this study of unitary human development. Rogers has proposed innovativeness as essential to healthy human development throughout life.

Burbank's (1986) critical evaluation of the three major theories of aging suggests the need for new theory. Descriptive studies of Rogers' theory have supported her contentions about creativity in younger age groups (Alligood, 1986; Cowling, 1986; Ference, 1986); however, studies of the elderly suggest the need to facilitate their creative expression (Alligood, 1991; Fitzpatrick and Goldberg, 1989). Therefore, the establishment of a relationship between creativity and health in a group of elderly persons could provide a theoretical basis for nursing interventions designed to foster creativity for health promotion among the elderly. This served as the rationale for this study of creativity and health in the elderly.

A cross-sectional survey design was utilized to carry out the study with a volunteer sample from retirement apartment in the South. The sample consisted of forty-four (44) men and women between the ages of 63 and 96 who resided in an independent living facility. Subjects completed a Demographic Information Form and four paper-pencil measures: Adjective Check List Gough, 1979) and Similes Preference Inventory (Pearson and Maddi, 1966) to measure creativity, and Laffrey Health Conception Scale (Laffrey, 1986) and Perceived Health Form (Melanson and Downe-Wamboldt, 1987) to measure health. Human rights of subjects were protected by a briefing prior to volunteering and being informed that they could withdraw from the study at any time. Data were collected at tables in a well lit room centrally located in the facility. Participation took 45 minutes to an hour. The research hypothesis that creativity and health are positively related was rejected with a correlation coefficient of r = -.30, significant at the .05 level. Implications of this finding will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
26-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
1991
Conference Host:
Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Location:
Tampa, Florida, USA
Description:
STTI 31st Biennial Convention. Held 11-15 November 1991 at the Tampa Convention Center. Theme: Creating Nursing's Future.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe relationship of creativity and health in the elderlyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAlligood, Martha Raileen_US
dc.author.detailsAlligood, Martha, PhD, Professor, University of Tennessee, email: malligoo@utk.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148483-
dc.description.abstractWith the rising number of elderly and the high cost of long term care, maintaining health and independent living among the elderly becomes increasingly important. Since health habits which contribute to health in the general population have been found to no longer predict longevity after the age of 65, there is need to study the elderly in order to identify factors which do contribute to their health and well-being.<br/><br/>This study tested the research hypothesis, creativity is positively related to health among the elderly. Rogers (1986) conceptual system provided the framework to guide this study of unitary human development. Rogers has proposed innovativeness as essential to healthy human development throughout life.<br/><br/>Burbank's (1986) critical evaluation of the three major theories of aging suggests the need for new theory. Descriptive studies of Rogers' theory have supported her contentions about creativity in younger age groups (Alligood, 1986; Cowling, 1986; Ference, 1986); however, studies of the elderly suggest the need to facilitate their creative expression (Alligood, 1991; Fitzpatrick and Goldberg, 1989). Therefore, the establishment of a relationship between creativity and health in a group of elderly persons could provide a theoretical basis for nursing interventions designed to foster creativity for health promotion among the elderly. This served as the rationale for this study of creativity and health in the elderly.<br/><br/>A cross-sectional survey design was utilized to carry out the study with a volunteer sample from retirement apartment in the South. The sample consisted of forty-four (44) men and women between the ages of 63 and 96 who resided in an independent living facility. Subjects completed a Demographic Information Form and four paper-pencil measures: Adjective Check List Gough, 1979) and Similes Preference Inventory (Pearson and Maddi, 1966) to measure creativity, and Laffrey Health Conception Scale (Laffrey, 1986) and Perceived Health Form (Melanson and Downe-Wamboldt, 1987) to measure health. Human rights of subjects were protected by a briefing prior to volunteering and being informed that they could withdraw from the study at any time. Data were collected at tables in a well lit room centrally located in the facility. Participation took 45 minutes to an hour. The research hypothesis that creativity and health are positively related was rejected with a correlation coefficient of r = -.30, significant at the .05 level. Implications of this finding will be discussed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:45:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-26en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:45:50Z-
dc.conference.date1991-
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.locationTampa, Florida, USAen_US
dc.descriptionSTTI 31st Biennial Convention. Held 11-15 November 1991 at the Tampa Convention Center. Theme: Creating Nursing's Future.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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