Outcomes of Using Clinical Simulations as a Teaching-Learning Intervention in Nursing Education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148492
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Outcomes of Using Clinical Simulations as a Teaching-Learning Intervention in Nursing Education
Abstract:
Outcomes of Using Clinical Simulations as a Teaching-Learning Intervention in Nursing Education
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Jeffries, Pamela R., RN, DNS
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Title:Associate Professor
Purpose: Providing simulations in nursing education is a relatively efficient method of teaching content and the skills of decision-making and problem-solving. Gaining an understanding of the process of designing, implementing, and evaluating simulations in nursing can be facilitated by a theoretical framework that specifies the variables and their relationships. An empirically supported framework and valid and reliable measures of the variables will help guide the design, implementation, and evaluation of simulations in nursing education and research. Background: A national group consisting of one Project Director and 8 Project Coordinators from different geographical sites organized by the National League for Nursing and the Laerdal Corporation, Inc. is currently leading efforts to conduct research on simulations. The team has developed a simulation framework based on learning theories to study design, implementation, and the use of simulations. A quasi-experimental exploratory study was conducted across 6 sites to test learning outcomes when incorporating a post-operative clinical simulation as a teaching strategy to enhance learning in a first-level nursing course. Three different simulations using different types of simulations: 1) paper/pencil; 2) a static mannequin; and 3) a patient simulator, were incorporated into a medical-surgical course to explore comparisons and contrasts of the three different simulations. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data in addition to a 3-way analyses of variance. Findings include the similarities and contrasts of learning outcomes among the three types of simulations along with satisfaction measures and simulation design features that were most important in the simulation experience. After completing the simulations, participants enjoyed the experience and requested more of these activities in their courses. With the current nursing and nurse educator shortage, more innovative, effective instructional models need to be designed, implemented, and tested to provide students better quality educational experiences to prepare nurses for complex, clinical environments.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOutcomes of Using Clinical Simulations as a Teaching-Learning Intervention in Nursing Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148492-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Outcomes of Using Clinical Simulations as a Teaching-Learning Intervention in Nursing Education</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jeffries, Pamela R., RN, DNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">prjeffri@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Providing simulations in nursing education is a relatively efficient method of teaching content and the skills of decision-making and problem-solving. Gaining an understanding of the process of designing, implementing, and evaluating simulations in nursing can be facilitated by a theoretical framework that specifies the variables and their relationships. An empirically supported framework and valid and reliable measures of the variables will help guide the design, implementation, and evaluation of simulations in nursing education and research. Background: A national group consisting of one Project Director and 8 Project Coordinators from different geographical sites organized by the National League for Nursing and the Laerdal Corporation, Inc. is currently leading efforts to conduct research on simulations. The team has developed a simulation framework based on learning theories to study design, implementation, and the use of simulations. A quasi-experimental exploratory study was conducted across 6 sites to test learning outcomes when incorporating a post-operative clinical simulation as a teaching strategy to enhance learning in a first-level nursing course. Three different simulations using different types of simulations: 1) paper/pencil; 2) a static mannequin; and 3) a patient simulator, were incorporated into a medical-surgical course to explore comparisons and contrasts of the three different simulations. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data in addition to a 3-way analyses of variance. Findings include the similarities and contrasts of learning outcomes among the three types of simulations along with satisfaction measures and simulation design features that were most important in the simulation experience. After completing the simulations, participants enjoyed the experience and requested more of these activities in their courses. With the current nursing and nurse educator shortage, more innovative, effective instructional models need to be designed, implemented, and tested to provide students better quality educational experiences to prepare nurses for complex, clinical environments.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:45:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:45:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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