Blending Voices of Mexican-American Cancer Caregivers and Healthcare Providers to Improve Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148495
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Blending Voices of Mexican-American Cancer Caregivers and Healthcare Providers to Improve Care
Abstract:
Blending Voices of Mexican-American Cancer Caregivers and Healthcare Providers to Improve Care
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Cagle, Carolyn Spence, PhD, RNC
P.I. Institution Name:TCU - Harris College of Nursing and Health Sciences
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Elizabeth Wolff, ; David Jenkins, PhD, LCSW; Mary Luna Hollen, PhD, RD, LD
[Scientific session research presentation] An earlier grounded theory study provided insight into the influence of culture on Mexican American (MA) females "becoming stronger" through cancer caregiving. This study also indicated caregiver desire to learn more about cancer, ways to provide patient care, and strategies for talking to the doctor and ill one about cancer. This knowledge must be blended with that of health care providers to support evidence-based practice meeting MA caregiver and family needs. A focus group approach, utilizing diverse health care staff in the clinic used by MA caregivers, provided a sociopolitical context to interpret caregiver response to cancer and learning/support needs, the purpose of the study. Interdisciplinary research team content analysis of focus group data from 12 health care providers identified various themes. Themes included MA families fear patient death or embarrassment related to the diagnosis; too few social services, interpreters, and readable learning materials exist to meet MA family complex needs with cancer; and, at times, MA family networks influence clinic health care providers' ability to provide needed information. These factors may block MA caregiver understanding of cancer and learning needs related to medications, pain, and nutrition as identified in the earlier study. Strong cultural values of "believing the doctor" and to "not tell the patient the diagnosis to maintain hope" also influence caregiver ability to openly communicate with doctor and patient. Study implications include health care system partnering with Spanish-speaking community health workers to understand the cultural meaning of cancer that influences caregiver learning needs and relevant strategies, including use of acceptable social services, to meet those needs. Overall, blending voices of MA cancer caregivers and health care providers to improve the structure and process of care can lead to beneficial outcomes for both groups. Funded Beta Alpha Chapter, Sigma Theta Tau
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBlending Voices of Mexican-American Cancer Caregivers and Healthcare Providers to Improve Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148495-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Blending Voices of Mexican-American Cancer Caregivers and Healthcare Providers to Improve Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cagle, Carolyn Spence, PhD, RNC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">TCU - Harris College of Nursing and Health Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">c.cagle@tcu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Elizabeth Wolff, ; David Jenkins, PhD, LCSW; Mary Luna Hollen, PhD, RD, LD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] An earlier grounded theory study provided insight into the influence of culture on Mexican American (MA) females &quot;becoming stronger&quot; through cancer caregiving. This study also indicated caregiver desire to learn more about cancer, ways to provide patient care, and strategies for talking to the doctor and ill one about cancer. This knowledge must be blended with that of health care providers to support evidence-based practice meeting MA caregiver and family needs. A focus group approach, utilizing diverse health care staff in the clinic used by MA caregivers, provided a sociopolitical context to interpret caregiver response to cancer and learning/support needs, the purpose of the study. Interdisciplinary research team content analysis of focus group data from 12 health care providers identified various themes. Themes included MA families fear patient death or embarrassment related to the diagnosis; too few social services, interpreters, and readable learning materials exist to meet MA family complex needs with cancer; and, at times, MA family networks influence clinic health care providers' ability to provide needed information. These factors may block MA caregiver understanding of cancer and learning needs related to medications, pain, and nutrition as identified in the earlier study. Strong cultural values of &quot;believing the doctor&quot; and to &quot;not tell the patient the diagnosis to maintain hope&quot; also influence caregiver ability to openly communicate with doctor and patient. Study implications include health care system partnering with Spanish-speaking community health workers to understand the cultural meaning of cancer that influences caregiver learning needs and relevant strategies, including use of acceptable social services, to meet those needs. Overall, blending voices of MA cancer caregivers and health care providers to improve the structure and process of care can lead to beneficial outcomes for both groups. Funded Beta Alpha Chapter, Sigma Theta Tau</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:46:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:46:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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