Career choice satisfaction and career maturity of baccalaureate nursing students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148500
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Career choice satisfaction and career maturity of baccalaureate nursing students
Abstract:
Career choice satisfaction and career maturity of baccalaureate nursing students
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Carlisle, Joan, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of AlabamaSchool of Nursing, UAB
Title:Assistant Professor
This cross-sectional study examined career choice satisfaction and career maturity of baccalaureate nursing students. Students with high career maturity will make wiser career decisions, thereby enhancing their self and career satisfaction (Holland, 1978). However, little is known regarding the pattern of career maturity and how this concept changes throughout the nursing program. The following research questions were formulated: (a) what is the career choice satisfaction and career maturity of baccalaureate nursing students?; (b) Is there a relationship between career choice satisfaction and career maturity of baccalaureate nursing students?; and (c) Is there a difference in career choice satisfaction and career maturity of baccalaureate nursing students at the beginning, junior and senior levels?



Career development theory (Super, 1957) was the framework for this research. Data were collected Fall, 1990 from students enrolled in three levels of nursing courses at a large southeastern university. A total of 130 subjects participated in the study. The Career Maturity Inventory Attitude Scale (Crites, 1978) was utilized to measure career maturity (possible score = 50). Subjects used a 10 point rating scale to indicate their level of career choice satisfaction (1 = least; 10 = most).



The mode satisfaction score for both the sample and each level was 10 (36.2%). Scores ranged from 3 to 10 with a median score of 9. The career maturity scores ranged from 25 to 46 with a mean of 37.485 (SD = 4.132). For comparison, the 50th percentile score for high school seniors is a score of 36. No significant relationship was demonstrated between career choice satisfaction and career maturity (p = .1484, p > .05). A one-way ANOVA demonstrated no significant difference in career maturity scores across the three levels of the nursing program (p = .23). Likewise, no significant difference was found in career choice satisfaction scores across the three levels (Chi square = .9203, p = .63). Nurse educators should provide individual career guidance for students and identify strategies that promote career maturity. Future longitudinal studies should focus on career maturity and career choice satisfaction of students as they progress through the nursing program and move into the practice arena.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCareer choice satisfaction and career maturity of baccalaureate nursing studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148500-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Career choice satisfaction and career maturity of baccalaureate nursing students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Carlisle, Joan, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of AlabamaSchool of Nursing, UAB</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">carlislj@admin.son.uab.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This cross-sectional study examined career choice satisfaction and career maturity of baccalaureate nursing students. Students with high career maturity will make wiser career decisions, thereby enhancing their self and career satisfaction (Holland, 1978). However, little is known regarding the pattern of career maturity and how this concept changes throughout the nursing program. The following research questions were formulated: (a) what is the career choice satisfaction and career maturity of baccalaureate nursing students?; (b) Is there a relationship between career choice satisfaction and career maturity of baccalaureate nursing students?; and (c) Is there a difference in career choice satisfaction and career maturity of baccalaureate nursing students at the beginning, junior and senior levels?<br/><br/><br/><br/>Career development theory (Super, 1957) was the framework for this research. Data were collected Fall, 1990 from students enrolled in three levels of nursing courses at a large southeastern university. A total of 130 subjects participated in the study. The Career Maturity Inventory Attitude Scale (Crites, 1978) was utilized to measure career maturity (possible score = 50). Subjects used a 10 point rating scale to indicate their level of career choice satisfaction (1 = least; 10 = most).<br/><br/><br/><br/>The mode satisfaction score for both the sample and each level was 10 (36.2%). Scores ranged from 3 to 10 with a median score of 9. The career maturity scores ranged from 25 to 46 with a mean of 37.485 (SD = 4.132). For comparison, the 50th percentile score for high school seniors is a score of 36. No significant relationship was demonstrated between career choice satisfaction and career maturity (p = .1484, p &gt; .05). A one-way ANOVA demonstrated no significant difference in career maturity scores across the three levels of the nursing program (p = .23). Likewise, no significant difference was found in career choice satisfaction scores across the three levels (Chi square = .9203, p = .63). Nurse educators should provide individual career guidance for students and identify strategies that promote career maturity. Future longitudinal studies should focus on career maturity and career choice satisfaction of students as they progress through the nursing program and move into the practice arena.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:46:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:46:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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