Life transitions of parents at the death of a school age and older child

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148506
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Life transitions of parents at the death of a school age and older child
Abstract:
Life transitions of parents at the death of a school age and older child
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Kachoyeanos, Mary, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:Childrens Hospital of Wisconsin
Title:Nursing Research Coordinator
Problem: The death of a child is a critical life event for parents,

which disrupts their current reality and necessitates a

restructuring of their reality. Previous investigations of

parental responses to the death of a child have been focused

primarily on the unexpected death of an infant or on the expected

death of a child from a chronic/life threatening illness. Purpose:

The purpose of this descriptive, qualitative study, was to describe

the reported responses of parents to the unexpected death of a

child, school age and older.



Significance: The goal was to gain insights about how nurses,

bereavement counselors and clergy can support parents in this

experience. The study is viewed as a contribution to the incomplete

knowledge base in the area of parental grief responses to the

unexpected death of a child. Conceptual Basis: Life Transition

Theory (Selder, 1989) was the framework of the study.



Methods/Design: A qualitative design was used. Data were collected

in single, tape recorded private interviews.



Subjects: The non-randomized sample consisted of 27 parents, 11

intact couples and 5 single mothers, whose child had died suddenly

subsequent to an accident or fulminating infection. The child was

dead at least one year at the time of interview and parents were not

n therapy for grief resolution.



Data Analysis: Approach in data analysis was analytic induction.

Interview transcripts were checked for accuracy with audio tapes.

The data were then coded using the life transition coding scheme.

All interviews were coded by both investigators, any differences

were resolved by discussions with a third reviewer familiar with

the coding system. Intercoder reliability was established at .99.

Data had to represent the category in the coding scheme, or a new

category was developed. For instance, things parents did to keep

the essence of their child present, such as pictures, did not fit

existing categories; necessitating the establishment of a new

category.



Findings: Unlike previous grief theories, the findings of this

study suggest there are no time lines for resolution of grief.

Rather parents experience certain processes that recur over time.

Though these processes diminish over time, they do not disappear.

Processes identified and described are: presencing (the child)

which is a way of experiencing memories of their child;

reactivation, which is a process of re-experiencing the trauma of

the death; missed options are those things the parent will never

experience with their child such as graduation and so on. A major

finding of the study is the differences in how mothers and fathers

respond to the death. A description of factors that parents found

helpful and not helpful in assisting them through this critical

life event are provided. Suggestions for health professionals to

assist parents whose child died suddenly are offered.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLife transitions of parents at the death of a school age and older childen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148506-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Life transitions of parents at the death of a school age and older child</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kachoyeanos, Mary, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Childrens Hospital of Wisconsin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing Research Coordinator</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: The death of a child is a critical life event for parents,<br/><br/>which disrupts their current reality and necessitates a<br/><br/>restructuring of their reality. Previous investigations of<br/><br/>parental responses to the death of a child have been focused<br/><br/>primarily on the unexpected death of an infant or on the expected<br/><br/>death of a child from a chronic/life threatening illness. Purpose:<br/><br/>The purpose of this descriptive, qualitative study, was to describe<br/><br/>the reported responses of parents to the unexpected death of a<br/><br/>child, school age and older.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Significance: The goal was to gain insights about how nurses,<br/><br/>bereavement counselors and clergy can support parents in this<br/><br/>experience. The study is viewed as a contribution to the incomplete<br/><br/>knowledge base in the area of parental grief responses to the<br/><br/>unexpected death of a child. Conceptual Basis: Life Transition<br/><br/>Theory (Selder, 1989) was the framework of the study.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Methods/Design: A qualitative design was used. Data were collected<br/><br/>in single, tape recorded private interviews.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Subjects: The non-randomized sample consisted of 27 parents, 11<br/><br/>intact couples and 5 single mothers, whose child had died suddenly<br/><br/>subsequent to an accident or fulminating infection. The child was<br/><br/>dead at least one year at the time of interview and parents were not<br/><br/>n therapy for grief resolution.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Data Analysis: Approach in data analysis was analytic induction.<br/><br/>Interview transcripts were checked for accuracy with audio tapes.<br/><br/>The data were then coded using the life transition coding scheme.<br/><br/>All interviews were coded by both investigators, any differences<br/><br/>were resolved by discussions with a third reviewer familiar with<br/><br/>the coding system. Intercoder reliability was established at .99.<br/><br/>Data had to represent the category in the coding scheme, or a new<br/><br/>category was developed. For instance, things parents did to keep<br/><br/>the essence of their child present, such as pictures, did not fit<br/><br/>existing categories; necessitating the establishment of a new<br/><br/>category.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Findings: Unlike previous grief theories, the findings of this<br/><br/>study suggest there are no time lines for resolution of grief.<br/><br/>Rather parents experience certain processes that recur over time.<br/><br/>Though these processes diminish over time, they do not disappear.<br/><br/>Processes identified and described are: presencing (the child)<br/><br/>which is a way of experiencing memories of their child;<br/><br/>reactivation, which is a process of re-experiencing the trauma of<br/><br/>the death; missed options are those things the parent will never<br/><br/>experience with their child such as graduation and so on. A major<br/><br/>finding of the study is the differences in how mothers and fathers<br/><br/>respond to the death. A description of factors that parents found<br/><br/>helpful and not helpful in assisting them through this critical<br/><br/>life event are provided. Suggestions for health professionals to<br/><br/>assist parents whose child died suddenly are offered.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:46:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:46:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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