The relationship among head nurse role characteristics, job satisfaction, and unit outcomes (DISS)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148507
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The relationship among head nurse role characteristics, job satisfaction, and unit outcomes (DISS)
Abstract:
The relationship among head nurse role characteristics, job satisfaction, and unit outcomes (DISS)
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Tumulty, Gail, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University
In recent years, the head nurse role in the acute care setting has

expanded in scope and focus. Yes, little research has examined the

impact of this role change. Therefore, the purpose of this study

was to test the relationships among selected head nurse role

characteristics, head nurse job satisfaction, and unit outcomes.

Sociotechnical systems theory provided the broad theory base for

the study and role theory was used to explore the role of the head

nurse within the organizational system. A cross sectional

correlational design was used to collect data on the variables of

interest. The sample consisted of 110 head nurses from 10 acute

care hospitals in one southwestern state. Head nurse role

characteristics of autonomy and feedback were measured by a

combination of items from the Job Diagnostic Survey and the

Downs-Hazen Measure. A third role characteristic, role stress,

included three concepts. Role conflict and ambiguity were measured

by the Role Conflict/Ambiguity Scale and role deprivation was

measured with the Nursing Role Conception Scale. Job satisfaction

was measured using the Index of Work Satisfaction designed

specifically for use with nurses. Unit outcomes of registered

nurse retention, patient satisfaction, nosocomial infections,

falls, and skin integrity were obtained from data routinely

collected by the participating institutions. Demographic data were

collected on personal and organizational characteristics.

Descriptive statistics were used to determine areas of job

dissatisfaction and role stress of the head nurses.



Results of correlation and regression analysis revealed significant

relationships (p=<.05) between role characteristics and job

satisfaction; between job satisfaction and outcomes, and between

role characteristics and outcomes. Four role characteristics of

feedback, conflict, role deprivation, and autonomy explained 52

percent ofthe variance in head nurse job satisfaction, and head nurse

satisfaction predicted registered nurse retention (17%). Feedback

explained an additional 10 percent of the variance in RN retention.

Head nurse autonomy was significantly related to patient satisfaction

(r=.24); and head nurse role stress negatively affected RN

retention (r=-.30) and patient skin integrity (r=-.34). Head nurse

satisfaction with autonomy explained 16 percent of the variance in

registered nurse retention, and satisfaction with pay explained 9

percent of the variance in infection. Results indicate job redesign

efforts in specific organizations could result in greater head

nurse job satisfaction, increased RN retention, and improved

patient outcomes.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe relationship among head nurse role characteristics, job satisfaction, and unit outcomes (DISS)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148507-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The relationship among head nurse role characteristics, job satisfaction, and unit outcomes (DISS)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tumulty, Gail, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gtumulty@loyno.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In recent years, the head nurse role in the acute care setting has<br/><br/>expanded in scope and focus. Yes, little research has examined the<br/><br/>impact of this role change. Therefore, the purpose of this study<br/><br/>was to test the relationships among selected head nurse role<br/><br/>characteristics, head nurse job satisfaction, and unit outcomes.<br/><br/>Sociotechnical systems theory provided the broad theory base for<br/><br/>the study and role theory was used to explore the role of the head<br/><br/>nurse within the organizational system. A cross sectional<br/><br/>correlational design was used to collect data on the variables of<br/><br/>interest. The sample consisted of 110 head nurses from 10 acute<br/><br/>care hospitals in one southwestern state. Head nurse role<br/><br/>characteristics of autonomy and feedback were measured by a<br/><br/>combination of items from the Job Diagnostic Survey and the<br/><br/>Downs-Hazen Measure. A third role characteristic, role stress,<br/><br/>included three concepts. Role conflict and ambiguity were measured<br/><br/>by the Role Conflict/Ambiguity Scale and role deprivation was<br/><br/>measured with the Nursing Role Conception Scale. Job satisfaction<br/><br/>was measured using the Index of Work Satisfaction designed<br/><br/>specifically for use with nurses. Unit outcomes of registered<br/><br/>nurse retention, patient satisfaction, nosocomial infections,<br/><br/>falls, and skin integrity were obtained from data routinely<br/><br/>collected by the participating institutions. Demographic data were<br/><br/>collected on personal and organizational characteristics.<br/><br/>Descriptive statistics were used to determine areas of job<br/><br/>dissatisfaction and role stress of the head nurses.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Results of correlation and regression analysis revealed significant<br/><br/>relationships (p=&lt;.05) between role characteristics and job<br/><br/>satisfaction; between job satisfaction and outcomes, and between<br/><br/>role characteristics and outcomes. Four role characteristics of<br/><br/>feedback, conflict, role deprivation, and autonomy explained 52<br/><br/>percent ofthe variance in head nurse job satisfaction, and head nurse<br/><br/>satisfaction predicted registered nurse retention (17%). Feedback<br/><br/>explained an additional 10 percent of the variance in RN retention.<br/><br/>Head nurse autonomy was significantly related to patient satisfaction<br/><br/>(r=.24); and head nurse role stress negatively affected RN<br/><br/>retention (r=-.30) and patient skin integrity (r=-.34). Head nurse<br/><br/>satisfaction with autonomy explained 16 percent of the variance in<br/><br/>registered nurse retention, and satisfaction with pay explained 9<br/><br/>percent of the variance in infection. Results indicate job redesign<br/><br/>efforts in specific organizations could result in greater head<br/><br/>nurse job satisfaction, increased RN retention, and improved<br/><br/>patient outcomes.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:46:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:46:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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