Educator perception and use of pattern recognition principles in baccalaureate nursing programs (DISS)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148508
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Educator perception and use of pattern recognition principles in baccalaureate nursing programs (DISS)
Abstract:
Educator perception and use of pattern recognition principles in baccalaureate nursing programs (DISS)
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Welk, Dorette, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Bloomsburg University
Title:Professor
One of the major reasons for which registered nurses are sued is the failure to recognize the significance of information such that the patient is harmed. Through instructional strategies, nursing educators provide typical examples of health-related patterns which are to be recognized. Rapid recognition of patterns is regulated by exposure to typical examples, with attention to their feature frequency, number, and context; to the probability of features occurring; and to priming activities by the teacher. The two research questions were: what are baccalaureate nursing educator perceptions regarding principles which facilitate pattern recognition through instructional strategies? and what is their reported use of instructional strategies based on pattern recognition principles? The national random sampling of 38 programs representing research, comprehensive, and liberal arts institutions yielded a sample of 255 full-time educators who completed a Likert-type questionnaire with subscale reliabilities of .93 and .55. Results showed that the majority of nursing educators agreed with the principles of feature frequency, number, probability, and context, and disagreed with the priming principle. The majority of nursing educators indicated a greater than sometimes use of planned discourse, questioning techniques, algorithms and heuristics, advanced organizers, and environment-based techniques. The majority did not report using paradigm cases, print format, simulations, and stating probability estimates. Nursing educators were more apt to be aware of principles (F(1,252)=8.345, p<.01) and to use strategies (F(1,252)=5.366, p<.05) if they held doctorates and had taken a teaching and learning principles course. The conclusions were that nursing educators are aware of principles underlying pattern recognition and use a variety of strategies. Further exploration of possible reasons for nurses' failure to recognize the significance of clinical information shifts to studying learners and specific strategies, and to identifying influential parameters within the clinical setting itself. Recommendations include greater dissemination of information to nursing educators relative to teacher-initiated priming and to those strategies which they reported using less than sometimes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEducator perception and use of pattern recognition principles in baccalaureate nursing programs (DISS)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148508-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Educator perception and use of pattern recognition principles in baccalaureate nursing programs (DISS)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Welk, Dorette, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Bloomsburg University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dwelk@bloomu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">One of the major reasons for which registered nurses are sued is the failure to recognize the significance of information such that the patient is harmed. Through instructional strategies, nursing educators provide typical examples of health-related patterns which are to be recognized. Rapid recognition of patterns is regulated by exposure to typical examples, with attention to their feature frequency, number, and context; to the probability of features occurring; and to priming activities by the teacher. The two research questions were: what are baccalaureate nursing educator perceptions regarding principles which facilitate pattern recognition through instructional strategies? and what is their reported use of instructional strategies based on pattern recognition principles? The national random sampling of 38 programs representing research, comprehensive, and liberal arts institutions yielded a sample of 255 full-time educators who completed a Likert-type questionnaire with subscale reliabilities of .93 and .55. Results showed that the majority of nursing educators agreed with the principles of feature frequency, number, probability, and context, and disagreed with the priming principle. The majority of nursing educators indicated a greater than sometimes use of planned discourse, questioning techniques, algorithms and heuristics, advanced organizers, and environment-based techniques. The majority did not report using paradigm cases, print format, simulations, and stating probability estimates. Nursing educators were more apt to be aware of principles (F(1,252)=8.345, p&lt;.01) and to use strategies (F(1,252)=5.366, p&lt;.05) if they held doctorates and had taken a teaching and learning principles course. The conclusions were that nursing educators are aware of principles underlying pattern recognition and use a variety of strategies. Further exploration of possible reasons for nurses' failure to recognize the significance of clinical information shifts to studying learners and specific strategies, and to identifying influential parameters within the clinical setting itself. Recommendations include greater dissemination of information to nursing educators relative to teacher-initiated priming and to those strategies which they reported using less than sometimes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:46:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:46:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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