2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148509
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preterm infant's responses to sensory stimuli
Abstract:
Preterm infant's responses to sensory stimuli
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:White-Traut, Rosemary, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Associate Professor and Department Head
Preterm infants are at risk for developmental delay. Current research suggests that when preterm infants receive a developmentally appropriate form of sensory stimuli, the delays may be remediated. To determine the safety of a developmental intervention for use with preterm infants between 33 and 34 weeks post-conceptional age, this study examined arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), pulse rate (PR), and infant behavioral state (IBS) responses of preterm infants to auditory, tactile, visual and vestibular (ATVV) stimuli. Forty preterm infants not receiving ventilatory support were studied to determine their physiological and behavioral responses to ATVV stimulation. Infants were randomized into control (n=20) and experimental (n=20) groups. Infants assigned to the control group received no additional intervention. The experimental treatment consisted of auditory, tactile, visual and vestibular (ATVV) stimuli which was administered for 15 minutes once daily for 4 days. This consisted of 10 minutes of cephalocaudal massage and 5 minutes of rocking. PR, SaO2 and IBS were recorded at predetermined intervals (baseline, every 2.5 minutes during the treatment, and every 5 minutes post treatment). Results indicated that infants receiving the technique maintained a stable SaO2 over time while exhibiting an increase in PR during the experimental treatment. Infant behavioral state changed from active sleep to alert states for the experimental group but not for the control group. A repeated measures ANOVA identified significant differences in PR (p = 0.0105), SaO2 (p = 0.0275), and IBS (p < 0.00001) responses between the control and experimental group infants during the experimental treatment. The findings suggest that alertness increased over time for the experimental group (p < 0.00005) and that group differences in alertness persisted longer than group differences in PR and SaO2 (p < 0.025). The results suggest that healthy stable preterm infants between 33 and 34 weeks post-conceptional age respond physiologically and behaviorally to ATVV stimuli. The findings also suggest that SaO2 and PR were dependent upon changes in behavioral state. Although the infants experienced a significant increase in PR, these changes remained within a normal range for the preterm infant.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreterm infant's responses to sensory stimulien_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148509-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Preterm infant's responses to sensory stimuli</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">White-Traut, Rosemary, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor and Department Head</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rwt@uic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Preterm infants are at risk for developmental delay. Current research suggests that when preterm infants receive a developmentally appropriate form of sensory stimuli, the delays may be remediated. To determine the safety of a developmental intervention for use with preterm infants between 33 and 34 weeks post-conceptional age, this study examined arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), pulse rate (PR), and infant behavioral state (IBS) responses of preterm infants to auditory, tactile, visual and vestibular (ATVV) stimuli. Forty preterm infants not receiving ventilatory support were studied to determine their physiological and behavioral responses to ATVV stimulation. Infants were randomized into control (n=20) and experimental (n=20) groups. Infants assigned to the control group received no additional intervention. The experimental treatment consisted of auditory, tactile, visual and vestibular (ATVV) stimuli which was administered for 15 minutes once daily for 4 days. This consisted of 10 minutes of cephalocaudal massage and 5 minutes of rocking. PR, SaO2 and IBS were recorded at predetermined intervals (baseline, every 2.5 minutes during the treatment, and every 5 minutes post treatment). Results indicated that infants receiving the technique maintained a stable SaO2 over time while exhibiting an increase in PR during the experimental treatment. Infant behavioral state changed from active sleep to alert states for the experimental group but not for the control group. A repeated measures ANOVA identified significant differences in PR (p = 0.0105), SaO2 (p = 0.0275), and IBS (p &lt; 0.00001) responses between the control and experimental group infants during the experimental treatment. The findings suggest that alertness increased over time for the experimental group (p &lt; 0.00005) and that group differences in alertness persisted longer than group differences in PR and SaO2 (p &lt; 0.025). The results suggest that healthy stable preterm infants between 33 and 34 weeks post-conceptional age respond physiologically and behaviorally to ATVV stimuli. The findings also suggest that SaO2 and PR were dependent upon changes in behavioral state. Although the infants experienced a significant increase in PR, these changes remained within a normal range for the preterm infant.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:46:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:46:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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