An evaluation of the 1987 Texas Senate Bill 1160: The effectiveness of legislated accountability requirements for nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148511
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An evaluation of the 1987 Texas Senate Bill 1160: The effectiveness of legislated accountability requirements for nurses
Abstract:
An evaluation of the 1987 Texas Senate Bill 1160: The effectiveness of legislated accountability requirements for nurses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Green, Alexia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Lamar University
Title:Assistant Professor
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Senate Bill 1160 in promoting accountability for professional nursing practice within the State of Texas. Mandatory reporting and peer review were examined as mechanisms to promote accountability. This study provided information related to the following research questions: 1. How do professional and organizational accountability relating to mandatory reporting differ prior to as compared to after the enactment of Senate Bill 1160? 2. What are the differences in the use of peer review before as compared to after the enactment of Senate Bill 1160? The conceptual framework was based on the evaluation process as described by Suchman (1967).



A nonexperimental, explanatory evaluation research design was used to examine the effectiveness of Senate Bill 1160 in promoting nursing accountability within the State of Texas. Survey techniques were used to answer the research questions as related to Suchman's categories of evaluation. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to analyze the survey data generated from these categories of evaluation. In answering research question one, data was obtained from abstracts of records maintained by the Board of Nurse Examiners (BNE) and semi-structured interviews with BNE staff. The primary source of data for question two was the Peer Review Questionnaire developed by the investigator. The sample for question two consisted of 356 peer review committee members. Data analysis included the use of descriptive and inferential statistics.



Based on the findings of this study, it was concluded that professional nursing accountability was enhanced via the use of mandatory reporting and peer review as mandated by Senate Bill 1160. All categories of Suchman's evaluation framework were enhanced following the enactment of Senate Bill 1160. However, proportionally speaking in relation to the total RN population, a small number of registered nurses were being reported to the BNE for suspected violations of the professional practice act. This result suggests that under reporting is probably occurring. It was also concluded, that peer review was primarily being utilized as a reactive process and not in a proactive manner aimed at improving the overall quality of professional nursing practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn evaluation of the 1987 Texas Senate Bill 1160: The effectiveness of legislated accountability requirements for nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148511-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An evaluation of the 1987 Texas Senate Bill 1160: The effectiveness of legislated accountability requirements for nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Green, Alexia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Lamar University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">greenau@hal.lamar.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Senate Bill 1160 in promoting accountability for professional nursing practice within the State of Texas. Mandatory reporting and peer review were examined as mechanisms to promote accountability. This study provided information related to the following research questions: 1. How do professional and organizational accountability relating to mandatory reporting differ prior to as compared to after the enactment of Senate Bill 1160? 2. What are the differences in the use of peer review before as compared to after the enactment of Senate Bill 1160? The conceptual framework was based on the evaluation process as described by Suchman (1967).<br/><br/><br/><br/>A nonexperimental, explanatory evaluation research design was used to examine the effectiveness of Senate Bill 1160 in promoting nursing accountability within the State of Texas. Survey techniques were used to answer the research questions as related to Suchman's categories of evaluation. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to analyze the survey data generated from these categories of evaluation. In answering research question one, data was obtained from abstracts of records maintained by the Board of Nurse Examiners (BNE) and semi-structured interviews with BNE staff. The primary source of data for question two was the Peer Review Questionnaire developed by the investigator. The sample for question two consisted of 356 peer review committee members. Data analysis included the use of descriptive and inferential statistics.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Based on the findings of this study, it was concluded that professional nursing accountability was enhanced via the use of mandatory reporting and peer review as mandated by Senate Bill 1160. All categories of Suchman's evaluation framework were enhanced following the enactment of Senate Bill 1160. However, proportionally speaking in relation to the total RN population, a small number of registered nurses were being reported to the BNE for suspected violations of the professional practice act. This result suggests that under reporting is probably occurring. It was also concluded, that peer review was primarily being utilized as a reactive process and not in a proactive manner aimed at improving the overall quality of professional nursing practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:46:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:46:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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