Learning contracts promote leadership development of community health nursing students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148514
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Learning contracts promote leadership development of community health nursing students
Abstract:
Learning contracts promote leadership development of community health nursing students
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Jones, Jeanette, MS/MSc
P.I. Institution Name:MCV-VCU
Title:Assistant Professor
A challenge to nurse educators is to develop strategies that

promote leadership skills of future nurses in the practice setting.

The landmark report, The Future of Public Health, called for

community health professionals who can provide management,

political and organizational skills. Andragogy, control and

critical thinking theories provided the conceptual framework.



The purpose of this analytical-longitudinal study, conducted in two

phases, was to determine if learning contracts affect nursing

students' leadership skills in community health nursing. Four

research questions were asked: (1) What objectives, strategies and

resources do students' identify in learning contracts? (2) Do

learning contracts provide the structure for students and enhance

their leadership skills? (3) How do learning contracts promote

students objectives? and (4) Does professional competency rating of

leadership skills increase at the end of the semester?



In the first phase, 43 undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students

participated, and three instruments were used: learning contracts,

competency rating scale and clinical satisfaction scale.

Descriptive and inferential statistics indicated that learning

contracts did have an impact on students competency and ability to

develop leadership skills. A significant relationship was found

between mean scores on the use of problem-solving skills,

recognition of the structure/ function of the organization and

involvement in the change process.



The second phase, a quasi-experimental study consisted of 54

students and the same instruments were used. Two hypotheses were

proposed: (1) students participating in a learning contract

demonstrate greater scores on the competency scale; and (2)

students participating in a learning contract demonstrate greater

satisfaction with their clinical experiences. A significant

relationship was found between students' use of a learning contract

and their rating of competency and clinical experiences.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLearning contracts promote leadership development of community health nursing studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148514-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Learning contracts promote leadership development of community health nursing students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jones, Jeanette, MS/MSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">MCV-VCU</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A challenge to nurse educators is to develop strategies that<br/><br/>promote leadership skills of future nurses in the practice setting.<br/><br/>The landmark report, The Future of Public Health, called for<br/><br/>community health professionals who can provide management,<br/><br/>political and organizational skills. Andragogy, control and<br/><br/>critical thinking theories provided the conceptual framework.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The purpose of this analytical-longitudinal study, conducted in two<br/><br/>phases, was to determine if learning contracts affect nursing<br/><br/>students' leadership skills in community health nursing. Four<br/><br/>research questions were asked: (1) What objectives, strategies and<br/><br/>resources do students' identify in learning contracts? (2) Do<br/><br/>learning contracts provide the structure for students and enhance<br/><br/>their leadership skills? (3) How do learning contracts promote<br/><br/>students objectives? and (4) Does professional competency rating of<br/><br/>leadership skills increase at the end of the semester?<br/><br/><br/><br/>In the first phase, 43 undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students<br/><br/>participated, and three instruments were used: learning contracts,<br/><br/>competency rating scale and clinical satisfaction scale.<br/><br/>Descriptive and inferential statistics indicated that learning<br/><br/>contracts did have an impact on students competency and ability to<br/><br/>develop leadership skills. A significant relationship was found<br/><br/>between mean scores on the use of problem-solving skills,<br/><br/>recognition of the structure/ function of the organization and<br/><br/>involvement in the change process.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The second phase, a quasi-experimental study consisted of 54<br/><br/>students and the same instruments were used. Two hypotheses were<br/><br/>proposed: (1) students participating in a learning contract<br/><br/>demonstrate greater scores on the competency scale; and (2)<br/><br/>students participating in a learning contract demonstrate greater<br/><br/>satisfaction with their clinical experiences. A significant<br/><br/>relationship was found between students' use of a learning contract<br/><br/>and their rating of competency and clinical experiences.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:46:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:46:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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