2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148519
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceived HIV/AIDS Risk Factors among Thai Adolescents
Abstract:
Perceived HIV/AIDS Risk Factors among Thai Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Saensom, Donwiwat
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona
Background: HIV/AIDS is a complicate condition that involves more than a person affected by the disease. Impacts of the disease on the general community are tremendous especially among developing countries where resources are modest. Almost two decades after the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Thailand, the incidence and prevalence rates of the infection climbed to their peak in 1995. After enormous efforts involving public health policies and interventions, the trend of the infection started to decline but still presents a challenge to Thai society with the estimated HIV/AIDS cases of 780,000 in the year 2000. Unique to Thailand, most individuals with HIV/AIDS have been young heterosexual adults (age 15-49 years old). Sexual behavior particularly heterosexual intercourse has been repeatedly found to be the strongest risk factor among this population. The mean onset of first sexual intercourse for both men and women has become lower than it was before, particularly for women. Frequent sex with commercial sex workers and infrequent use of protective measures are additional risk factors for HIV transmission. Most preventive intervention campaigns implemented in Thailand have primarily focused on modifying risky behaviors of the older groups of young adults and tend to ignore adolescents who soon will enter adulthood and thus possess the highest risk for HIV/AIDS transmission. In addition, HIV/AIDS research and interventions conducted to target merely individual risk factors have shown limited effects on resolution of the epidemic. Moreover, exclusive focus on individual behavioral modification can have very negative affects. This focus has the potential to decontextualize risk behaviors ignoring the social, economic, environmental, and cultural impacts on behaviors. It can also divert limited resources, blame the victim and produce a life style approach to what may be a problem of social policy. Focus on individual behavior may not consider the relative contribution of non-modifiable genetic factors and modifiable social and behavioral factors. It may produce interventions that can be harmful, and may contribute to the problem rather than solving it. Objective: This study is designed to describe and compare factors, as identified by ecological frameworks, perceived by Thai adolescents as placing them and people of their age at risk for HIV/AIDS. Design: A case-control study (descriptive and comparative study). Participants: Study participants are selected from Thai adolescents (15-19 years old) to form two subject groups. The case group consists of 90 adolescents with HIV/AIDS (45 males and 45 females) and the comparison group consists of 180 adolescents (90 males and 90 females) who do not have HIV/AIDS. (Alpha = 0.05, Two sided, Power = 80%, Relative Risk = 2.23, Exposure in Comparison Group = 20%). Method: Using information gathered from a pilot focus group, review of literature, and existing survey questionnaires, the researcher will construct the Ecological HIV/AIDS Risk Factor Questionnaire. The questionnaire will have 3 parts; (a) demographic data, (b) four levels of risk factors (intrapersonal, interpersonal, structural, and superstructural), and (c) an open ended question that asks the participants to identify and describe additional perceived risks that the questionnaire does not cover. Data collection will be done through a one-time semi-structured interview with each participant. Multiple logistic regression will be used to detect differences of risk factors between groups and build a model that predicts the likelihood of HIV/AIDS transmission. Content analysis will be used to analyze the qualitative data from open-ended question and the results will be incorporated with the multiple regression outcomes. Expected Outcomes: Participants with HIV/AIDS are expected to have higher degree of exposures to various levels of risk factors according to the ecological frameworks. Significant differences of perceived risk between the two groups will help identify actual risk factors for HIV/AIDS from a broad perspective. Results will contribute to the design of more appropriate preventive interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceived HIV/AIDS Risk Factors among Thai Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148519-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perceived HIV/AIDS Risk Factors among Thai Adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Saensom, Donwiwat</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dsaensom@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: HIV/AIDS is a complicate condition that involves more than a person affected by the disease. Impacts of the disease on the general community are tremendous especially among developing countries where resources are modest. Almost two decades after the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Thailand, the incidence and prevalence rates of the infection climbed to their peak in 1995. After enormous efforts involving public health policies and interventions, the trend of the infection started to decline but still presents a challenge to Thai society with the estimated HIV/AIDS cases of 780,000 in the year 2000. Unique to Thailand, most individuals with HIV/AIDS have been young heterosexual adults (age 15-49 years old). Sexual behavior particularly heterosexual intercourse has been repeatedly found to be the strongest risk factor among this population. The mean onset of first sexual intercourse for both men and women has become lower than it was before, particularly for women. Frequent sex with commercial sex workers and infrequent use of protective measures are additional risk factors for HIV transmission. Most preventive intervention campaigns implemented in Thailand have primarily focused on modifying risky behaviors of the older groups of young adults and tend to ignore adolescents who soon will enter adulthood and thus possess the highest risk for HIV/AIDS transmission. In addition, HIV/AIDS research and interventions conducted to target merely individual risk factors have shown limited effects on resolution of the epidemic. Moreover, exclusive focus on individual behavioral modification can have very negative affects. This focus has the potential to decontextualize risk behaviors ignoring the social, economic, environmental, and cultural impacts on behaviors. It can also divert limited resources, blame the victim and produce a life style approach to what may be a problem of social policy. Focus on individual behavior may not consider the relative contribution of non-modifiable genetic factors and modifiable social and behavioral factors. It may produce interventions that can be harmful, and may contribute to the problem rather than solving it. Objective: This study is designed to describe and compare factors, as identified by ecological frameworks, perceived by Thai adolescents as placing them and people of their age at risk for HIV/AIDS. Design: A case-control study (descriptive and comparative study). Participants: Study participants are selected from Thai adolescents (15-19 years old) to form two subject groups. The case group consists of 90 adolescents with HIV/AIDS (45 males and 45 females) and the comparison group consists of 180 adolescents (90 males and 90 females) who do not have HIV/AIDS. (Alpha = 0.05, Two sided, Power = 80%, Relative Risk = 2.23, Exposure in Comparison Group = 20%). Method: Using information gathered from a pilot focus group, review of literature, and existing survey questionnaires, the researcher will construct the Ecological HIV/AIDS Risk Factor Questionnaire. The questionnaire will have 3 parts; (a) demographic data, (b) four levels of risk factors (intrapersonal, interpersonal, structural, and superstructural), and (c) an open ended question that asks the participants to identify and describe additional perceived risks that the questionnaire does not cover. Data collection will be done through a one-time semi-structured interview with each participant. Multiple logistic regression will be used to detect differences of risk factors between groups and build a model that predicts the likelihood of HIV/AIDS transmission. Content analysis will be used to analyze the qualitative data from open-ended question and the results will be incorporated with the multiple regression outcomes. Expected Outcomes: Participants with HIV/AIDS are expected to have higher degree of exposures to various levels of risk factors according to the ecological frameworks. Significant differences of perceived risk between the two groups will help identify actual risk factors for HIV/AIDS from a broad perspective. Results will contribute to the design of more appropriate preventive interventions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:46:22Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:46:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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