Relationship of Functional Performance to Selected Health Indicators in an Inner-City, Underserved, Older Adult Population

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148520
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship of Functional Performance to Selected Health Indicators in an Inner-City, Underserved, Older Adult Population
Abstract:
Relationship of Functional Performance to Selected Health Indicators in an Inner-City, Underserved, Older Adult Population
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Twigg, Prudence
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Purpose: The purpose of the study was to examine the relationships between functional performance and health indicators for a community-dwelling sample of older adults. The study was part of a larger descriptive study of the health needs of an inner-city, underserved population. Theoretical Framework: A functional status framework described by Leidy (1994) was used to guide analysis and discussion of findings. Functional performance consists of activities that people do to meet their basic needs and is related to functional capacity, which is affected by multiple factors. Design: The study used a descriptive, cross-sectional design. Sample: A total of 342 adults (>age 50) were sampled: 233 (68.1%) randomly selected from an inner-city area designated as medically underserved with an additional 109 (31.9%) purposively sampled from public housing units in the same area. Age ranges of the sample were: 50-64 (42.1%), 65-74 (30.7%), 75-84 (19.6%), and >84 (7.6%). The sample was predominately African-American (85%) and female (60.2%). Methods: Older adults were interviewed in their homes by a health care team associated with a local nurse-managed health clinic. Information was collected regarding demographic data, family history, health problems, health care utilization, health risk behaviors, presence of pain, depressive symptoms, and self-report of functional limitations. Variables: Although the relationships between health indicators and participants’ scores on commonly used measures of function were examined, scores on an alternative operationalization of functional performance (walking, climbing stairs, and lifting/carrying), suggested by Stump and colleagues (1997), were found to be more related to the variables of interest. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale, with scores greater than 16 (out of a possible 60) indicating depression. Body mass index was calculated from height/weight data and classified as below, above, or at ideal body weight according to the recommendations of the Nutrition Screening Initiative for Older Adults. Pain was measured by a dichotomous item which asked if the person “often has pain.” Perceived health was self-rated on a five-point scale ranging from “excellent” to “poor.” Health care utilization was measured as the number of reported health visits over the past six months. Data Analysis: Complete data on functional performance was available on 288 participants. Data analysis techniques included correlation, Chi-Square, and ANOVA. Findings: One or more functional performance deficits were present in 61.5% of the sample. Females in the two older groups were more likely to have deficits; race was not a significant factor. Functional performance deficits were found to be significantly related to depression, pain, self-rated health, the number of health visits, and being greater than ideal body weight. Implications for Nursing: Significant numbers of older adults in this urban community suffered from functional performance limitations. Using Leidy’s framework of functional status, obesity, pain, and depression are conceptualized as variables which affect functional capacity and thus constrain functional performance. Functional performance is related to both self-rated health and health care utilization. The findings suggest that nurses should develop and implement health interventions for this population which target not only functional performance, but the adequate treatment of factors such as pain, depression, and obesity, which contribute to poor performance.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship of Functional Performance to Selected Health Indicators in an Inner-City, Underserved, Older Adult Populationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148520-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationship of Functional Performance to Selected Health Indicators in an Inner-City, Underserved, Older Adult Population</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Twigg, Prudence</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ptwigg@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of the study was to examine the relationships between functional performance and health indicators for a community-dwelling sample of older adults. The study was part of a larger descriptive study of the health needs of an inner-city, underserved population. Theoretical Framework: A functional status framework described by Leidy (1994) was used to guide analysis and discussion of findings. Functional performance consists of activities that people do to meet their basic needs and is related to functional capacity, which is affected by multiple factors. Design: The study used a descriptive, cross-sectional design. Sample: A total of 342 adults (&gt;age 50) were sampled: 233 (68.1%) randomly selected from an inner-city area designated as medically underserved with an additional 109 (31.9%) purposively sampled from public housing units in the same area. Age ranges of the sample were: 50-64 (42.1%), 65-74 (30.7%), 75-84 (19.6%), and &gt;84 (7.6%). The sample was predominately African-American (85%) and female (60.2%). Methods: Older adults were interviewed in their homes by a health care team associated with a local nurse-managed health clinic. Information was collected regarding demographic data, family history, health problems, health care utilization, health risk behaviors, presence of pain, depressive symptoms, and self-report of functional limitations. Variables: Although the relationships between health indicators and participants&rsquo; scores on commonly used measures of function were examined, scores on an alternative operationalization of functional performance (walking, climbing stairs, and lifting/carrying), suggested by Stump and colleagues (1997), were found to be more related to the variables of interest. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale, with scores greater than 16 (out of a possible 60) indicating depression. Body mass index was calculated from height/weight data and classified as below, above, or at ideal body weight according to the recommendations of the Nutrition Screening Initiative for Older Adults. Pain was measured by a dichotomous item which asked if the person &ldquo;often has pain.&rdquo; Perceived health was self-rated on a five-point scale ranging from &ldquo;excellent&rdquo; to &ldquo;poor.&rdquo; Health care utilization was measured as the number of reported health visits over the past six months. Data Analysis: Complete data on functional performance was available on 288 participants. Data analysis techniques included correlation, Chi-Square, and ANOVA. Findings: One or more functional performance deficits were present in 61.5% of the sample. Females in the two older groups were more likely to have deficits; race was not a significant factor. Functional performance deficits were found to be significantly related to depression, pain, self-rated health, the number of health visits, and being greater than ideal body weight. Implications for Nursing: Significant numbers of older adults in this urban community suffered from functional performance limitations. Using Leidy&rsquo;s framework of functional status, obesity, pain, and depression are conceptualized as variables which affect functional capacity and thus constrain functional performance. Functional performance is related to both self-rated health and health care utilization. The findings suggest that nurses should develop and implement health interventions for this population which target not only functional performance, but the adequate treatment of factors such as pain, depression, and obesity, which contribute to poor performance.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:46:23Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:46:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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