Using the Affective Domain for Student Evaluations: Creativity Revisited

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148523
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using the Affective Domain for Student Evaluations: Creativity Revisited
Abstract:
Using the Affective Domain for Student Evaluations: Creativity Revisited
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Malloy, Suzanne
P.I. Institution Name:San Jose State University
A critical part of every student's clinical experience is that of self-evaluation. While many clinical evaluations use Likert scales for rating the student’s abilities and performance, this presentation offers a different approach to self-evaluation. Individuals, who are right brain hemisphere dominant, are believed to focus differently than left brain dominant persons. The right brain hemisphere is responsible for creativity and feeling and visual imagery. These individuals are seen as having imaginations and often come to conclusions in an entirely different way than their left-brain dominant counterparts. In contrast, those who have left brain dominance, appear to be analytical thinkers. Other terms used to describe these people are that they are "linear thinkers" who think somewhat logically (i.e., one step after another). This presentation depicts students’ "works of art " and tells their stories. Students self-evaluate their clinical experiences, depicting personal growth graphically. Over the past 7 years, student's artistic creations have varied widely, and students genuinely enjoy each other's interpretations of their classmates' artwork. Students have enthusiastically embraced the activity. Previous self-declared "concrete thinkers", who don't think they can draw more than a stick figure, have used their creative energies to graphically depict their growth. Not surprisingly, the exciting part of their sharing with fellow classmates is their own personal interpretation of their drawing. For the faculty and the students who have used this tool for closure, it provides a way to actively reflect on the affective issues, and help the student appreciate how much they have grown personally, as well as professionally.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing the Affective Domain for Student Evaluations: Creativity Revisiteden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148523-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using the Affective Domain for Student Evaluations: Creativity Revisited</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Malloy, Suzanne</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">San Jose State University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smalloy@email.sjsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A critical part of every student's clinical experience is that of self-evaluation. While many clinical evaluations use Likert scales for rating the student&rsquo;s abilities and performance, this presentation offers a different approach to self-evaluation. Individuals, who are right brain hemisphere dominant, are believed to focus differently than left brain dominant persons. The right brain hemisphere is responsible for creativity and feeling and visual imagery. These individuals are seen as having imaginations and often come to conclusions in an entirely different way than their left-brain dominant counterparts. In contrast, those who have left brain dominance, appear to be analytical thinkers. Other terms used to describe these people are that they are &quot;linear thinkers&quot; who think somewhat logically (i.e., one step after another). This presentation depicts students&rsquo; &quot;works of art &quot; and tells their stories. Students self-evaluate their clinical experiences, depicting personal growth graphically. Over the past 7 years, student's artistic creations have varied widely, and students genuinely enjoy each other's interpretations of their classmates' artwork. Students have enthusiastically embraced the activity. Previous self-declared &quot;concrete thinkers&quot;, who don't think they can draw more than a stick figure, have used their creative energies to graphically depict their growth. Not surprisingly, the exciting part of their sharing with fellow classmates is their own personal interpretation of their drawing. For the faculty and the students who have used this tool for closure, it provides a way to actively reflect on the affective issues, and help the student appreciate how much they have grown personally, as well as professionally.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:46:26Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:46:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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