2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148524
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Embryonic Stem Cell Research
Abstract:
Embryonic Stem Cell Research
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Ryan, Marilyn
P.I. Institution Name:Valley-Wide Health Service, Inc.
Human embryonic stem cells are immature cells that can duplicate themselves and grow into different kinds of mature cells, and are the source of all specialized cells found in the human body. Research using these cells has been underway for many years with the first cells being isolated and cultured in 1998 (Bevington, 2000). Generally, the embryos used are considered as “left-overs” at fertility clinics and are donated for research purposes. Stem cells are removed when the embryo has been growing 7-14 days, and in the process the embryos are destroyed. When cultured, stem cells are directed to specialize and grow into tissue such as nerve or muscle cells. There are other sources for stem cells, however these have not received as much attention. Stem cell research does hold great potential, since it offers hope of cure of diseases and injuries such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s, heart disease, diabetes and spinal cord injuries. As scientists understand more about the characteristics of these cells and are able to direct growth, they will be able to create an unlimited supply of cells for use in treatment of genetic and acquired illness, birth defects, and organ transplant. These cells can also assist in advancing development of medications since testing not previously feasible, will be possible. This is truly fascinating and promising research. However there are other options to the use of embryos for stem cell acquisition. The rampant destruction of human embryos is considered a great cost for the advancement of medical science. Other proven sources include: bone marrow and skin from human donors, cadavers, umbilical cord blood, primordial germ cells from aborted fetuses, and transgenic animals or xenotransplantation. The future of stem cell research can move beyond exclusive use of human embryos. Promotion of alternative sources, such as from consenting adults, will move this fascinating and promising research forward.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmbryonic Stem Cell Researchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148524-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Embryonic Stem Cell Research</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ryan, Marilyn</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Valley-Wide Health Service, Inc.</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mdryan1@earthlink.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Human embryonic stem cells are immature cells that can duplicate themselves and grow into different kinds of mature cells, and are the source of all specialized cells found in the human body. Research using these cells has been underway for many years with the first cells being isolated and cultured in 1998 (Bevington, 2000). Generally, the embryos used are considered as &ldquo;left-overs&rdquo; at fertility clinics and are donated for research purposes. Stem cells are removed when the embryo has been growing 7-14 days, and in the process the embryos are destroyed. When cultured, stem cells are directed to specialize and grow into tissue such as nerve or muscle cells. There are other sources for stem cells, however these have not received as much attention. Stem cell research does hold great potential, since it offers hope of cure of diseases and injuries such as Parkinson&rsquo;s disease, Alzheimer&rsquo;s, heart disease, diabetes and spinal cord injuries. As scientists understand more about the characteristics of these cells and are able to direct growth, they will be able to create an unlimited supply of cells for use in treatment of genetic and acquired illness, birth defects, and organ transplant. These cells can also assist in advancing development of medications since testing not previously feasible, will be possible. This is truly fascinating and promising research. However there are other options to the use of embryos for stem cell acquisition. The rampant destruction of human embryos is considered a great cost for the advancement of medical science. Other proven sources include: bone marrow and skin from human donors, cadavers, umbilical cord blood, primordial germ cells from aborted fetuses, and transgenic animals or xenotransplantation. The future of stem cell research can move beyond exclusive use of human embryos. Promotion of alternative sources, such as from consenting adults, will move this fascinating and promising research forward.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:46:27Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:46:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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