Measuring Clinical Practice Parameters with Human Patient Simulation: A Pilot Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148532
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measuring Clinical Practice Parameters with Human Patient Simulation: A Pilot Study
Abstract:
Measuring Clinical Practice Parameters with Human Patient Simulation: A Pilot Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Roche, Joan P., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Massachusetts Amherst
Title:Assistant Clinical Professor
Co-Authors:Kavita Radhakrishnan, RN, BSN, MSEE; Helene Cunningham, MS, RN
[Clinical session research presentation] Background: Human Patient Simulations (HPS) are now increasingly being used in nursing education. However, no studies have measured the influence of systematic practice with HPS on clinical performance of nursing students. Purpose: To identify the nursing clinical practice parameters that are influenced by simulation practice and to measure clinical performance improvement. Method: The convenience sample consisting of 12 Senior Second Bachelor Nursing students of UMASS - Amherst were randomly assigned to an intervention and a control group. In addition to their clinical requirements, the intervention group participated in two practice simulation scenarios where they provided nursing care for two complex patients developed using the Laerdal simulation software. The control group completed their clinical requirements with no simulated practice. Using a complex two-patient simulation scenario, all the students were evaluated at the end of the semester based on their performance on safety, basic assessment skills, prioritization, problem focused assessment and consequent interventions. An evaluation tool developed was used to measure the student's performance during simulations by a faculty evaluator who had no knowledge of the student's group membership. Results: Students who practiced with the HPS in addition to their usual clinical training performed significantly better than the control group (usual clinical training alone) on Patient Identification (a subcategory of the safety category; p = 0.001), and on Assessing Vital Signs (a subcategory of the basic assessment category; p = 0.009). The control and intervention groups' performances were similar in every other category. Chi-square test was used for the comparison.Conclusions and Implications: This quasi-experimental study linked the use of simulation practice with better performance in student nurses? patient identification and assessment of vital signs in a complex two-patient assignment clinical scenario. The clinical simulation?s safe setting for clinical practice is ideal to practice high-risk procedures and low-volume, high-risk patient conditions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasuring Clinical Practice Parameters with Human Patient Simulation: A Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148532-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Measuring Clinical Practice Parameters with Human Patient Simulation: A Pilot Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Roche, Joan P., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Massachusetts Amherst</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Clinical Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jproche@nursing.umass.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kavita Radhakrishnan, RN, BSN, MSEE; Helene Cunningham, MS, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical session research presentation] Background: Human Patient Simulations (HPS) are now increasingly being used in nursing education. However, no studies have measured the influence of systematic practice with HPS on clinical performance of nursing students. Purpose: To identify the nursing clinical practice parameters that are influenced by simulation practice and to measure clinical performance improvement. Method: The convenience sample consisting of 12 Senior Second Bachelor Nursing students of UMASS - Amherst were randomly assigned to an intervention and a control group. In addition to their clinical requirements, the intervention group participated in two practice simulation scenarios where they provided nursing care for two complex patients developed using the Laerdal simulation software. The control group completed their clinical requirements with no simulated practice. Using a complex two-patient simulation scenario, all the students were evaluated at the end of the semester based on their performance on safety, basic assessment skills, prioritization, problem focused assessment and consequent interventions. An evaluation tool developed was used to measure the student's performance during simulations by a faculty evaluator who had no knowledge of the student's group membership. Results: Students who practiced with the HPS in addition to their usual clinical training performed significantly better than the control group (usual clinical training alone) on Patient Identification (a subcategory of the safety category; p = 0.001), and on Assessing Vital Signs (a subcategory of the basic assessment category; p = 0.009). The control and intervention groups' performances were similar in every other category. Chi-square test was used for the comparison.Conclusions and Implications: This quasi-experimental study linked the use of simulation practice with better performance in student nurses? patient identification and assessment of vital signs in a complex two-patient assignment clinical scenario. The clinical simulation?s safe setting for clinical practice is ideal to practice high-risk procedures and low-volume, high-risk patient conditions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:46:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:46:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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