Music as a Patterning Modality: Cumulative Effect of Daily Music Interventions

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148543
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Music as a Patterning Modality: Cumulative Effect of Daily Music Interventions
Abstract:
Music as a Patterning Modality: Cumulative Effect of Daily Music Interventions
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Siedlecki, Sandra, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Cleveland Clinic
Title:Senior Nurse Researcher
[Scientific session research presentation] The purpose of this secondary analysis was to examine the cumulative effect of music on pattern variations in patients with chronic non-malignant pain. Chronic non-malignant pain (CNMP) is a major health problem and impacts all aspects of an individual?s life. Previous research found music is effective in decreasing perceptions of pain, depression, and disability. However, most studies involved a limited number of music episodes; and no studies examined the cumulative effects of music on daily patterns of pain, depression, and disability. Secondary analysis was carried out using previously unexamined data from a daily diary used by music groups in a RCT of the effect of music on patterns of CNMP. Subjects were randomly assigned to either a standard or patterning music intervention, listened to their music an hour each day for a week, and recorded perceptions of pain, depression, and disability daily using visual analogue scales. Rogers? principles of homeodynamics (Resonancy, Helicy, and Integrality) provided the framework for this study. Thus it was posited that music would have a cumulative effect; supporting the notion of continuous, innovative, mutual human and environmental field processes. RM-ANOVA was used to examine the changes in pattern over time. The pattern identified in this analysis suggests that music has a cumulative effect on perceptions of pain and depression, and no differences were found between the two music groups; suggesting that different types of music may have similar effects and these effects accumulate with repeated interventions. Nurses can use this information to help patients design self-care programs that they can implement at home to facilitate patterns of health and wellness and decrease perceptions of pain and depression. Future research needs to expand on this theme and examine changes over longer periods of time, and feasibility or sustainability of incorporating music interventions into daily healthcare routines.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMusic as a Patterning Modality: Cumulative Effect of Daily Music Interventionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148543-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Music as a Patterning Modality: Cumulative Effect of Daily Music Interventions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Siedlecki, Sandra, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Cleveland Clinic</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Senior Nurse Researcher</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">siedles@ccf.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] The purpose of this secondary analysis was to examine the cumulative effect of music on pattern variations in patients with chronic non-malignant pain. Chronic non-malignant pain (CNMP) is a major health problem and impacts all aspects of an individual?s life. Previous research found music is effective in decreasing perceptions of pain, depression, and disability. However, most studies involved a limited number of music episodes; and no studies examined the cumulative effects of music on daily patterns of pain, depression, and disability. Secondary analysis was carried out using previously unexamined data from a daily diary used by music groups in a RCT of the effect of music on patterns of CNMP. Subjects were randomly assigned to either a standard or patterning music intervention, listened to their music an hour each day for a week, and recorded perceptions of pain, depression, and disability daily using visual analogue scales. Rogers? principles of homeodynamics (Resonancy, Helicy, and Integrality) provided the framework for this study. Thus it was posited that music would have a cumulative effect; supporting the notion of continuous, innovative, mutual human and environmental field processes. RM-ANOVA was used to examine the changes in pattern over time. The pattern identified in this analysis suggests that music has a cumulative effect on perceptions of pain and depression, and no differences were found between the two music groups; suggesting that different types of music may have similar effects and these effects accumulate with repeated interventions. Nurses can use this information to help patients design self-care programs that they can implement at home to facilitate patterns of health and wellness and decrease perceptions of pain and depression. Future research needs to expand on this theme and examine changes over longer periods of time, and feasibility or sustainability of incorporating music interventions into daily healthcare routines.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:46:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:46:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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