Exploring the Pregnancy Recognition Process using Group Interviews

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148591
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring the Pregnancy Recognition Process using Group Interviews
Abstract:
Exploring the Pregnancy Recognition Process using Group Interviews
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Ayoola, Adejoke B., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Calvin College
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Gail Landheer Zandee, MSN, RN; Jennifer R. Brewer, MA
[Scientific Session Presentation] Delays by women to recognize a pregnancy has been associated with increase in adverse birth outcomes such as preterm birth and low birth weight. For pregnant women to adopt pregnancy-related health-promoting behaviors and seek prenatal care, pregnancy must be recognized. Treating pregnancy recognition as a process, this study explored women's definition of pregnancy recognition, their experiences of becoming "sure of a pregnancy", and the factors that influenced the timeliness of pregnancy acceptance. A grounded theory approach was used for this qualitative study. Six focus group discussions were conducted among forty-one women of childbearing age who were pregnant or had experienced a pregnancy during the last three years. The discussions were held among racially homogeneous but four cultural groups- Caucasian, African American, Hispanic/Latino and Native Americans- until a point of saturation was reached. The sessions were tape-recorded, transcribed, and coded. The authors in a reiterative process analyzed the transcripts and used NVIVO to identify the main concepts related to the process of recognition and factors that facilitate early pregnancy acceptance. Preliminary analysis revealed the process of pregnancy recognition to be comprised of three main phases; suspicion, confirmation, and acceptance. The process appeared non-linear, and not to follow same sequence for the women.  Thus, some women did not suspect but had pregnancy confirmed during clinic/doctor's visit, some accepted the possibility of a pregnancy before confirmation. The main factors that influenced the process of recognition were:  experienced pregnancy signs and symptoms, knowledge of the body, pregnancy planning, pregnancy-testing /clinic visit, and contraceptive use/history. Knowledge of the body was identified as a dominant factor influencing pregnancy recognition. The process of pregnancy recognition is multifaceted; this study reveals the three main phases of the process.  An increased understanding of these phases provides important information for the design of interventions on promoting early pregnancy recognition.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploring the Pregnancy Recognition Process using Group Interviewsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148591-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Exploring the Pregnancy Recognition Process using Group Interviews</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ayoola, Adejoke B., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Calvin College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">aba3@calvin.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Gail Landheer Zandee, MSN, RN; Jennifer R. Brewer, MA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific Session Presentation] Delays by women to recognize a pregnancy has been associated with increase in adverse birth outcomes such as preterm birth and low birth weight. For pregnant women to adopt pregnancy-related health-promoting behaviors and seek prenatal care, pregnancy must be recognized. Treating pregnancy recognition as a process, this study explored women's definition of pregnancy recognition, their experiences of becoming &quot;sure of a pregnancy&quot;, and the factors that influenced the timeliness of pregnancy acceptance. A grounded theory approach was used for this qualitative study. Six focus group discussions were conducted among forty-one women of childbearing age who were pregnant or had experienced a pregnancy during the last three years. The discussions were held among racially homogeneous but four cultural groups- Caucasian, African American, Hispanic/Latino and Native Americans- until a point of saturation was reached. The sessions were tape-recorded, transcribed, and coded. The authors in a reiterative process analyzed the transcripts and used NVIVO to identify the main concepts related to the process of recognition and factors that facilitate early pregnancy acceptance. Preliminary analysis revealed the process of pregnancy recognition to be comprised of three main phases; suspicion, confirmation, and acceptance. The process appeared non-linear, and not to follow same sequence for the women.&nbsp; Thus, some women did not suspect but had pregnancy confirmed during clinic/doctor's visit, some accepted the possibility of a pregnancy before confirmation. The main factors that influenced the process of recognition were:&nbsp; experienced pregnancy signs and symptoms, knowledge of the body, pregnancy planning, pregnancy-testing /clinic visit, and contraceptive use/history. Knowledge of the body was identified as a dominant factor influencing pregnancy recognition. The process of pregnancy recognition is multifaceted; this study reveals the three main phases of the process.&nbsp; An increased understanding of these phases provides important information for the design of interventions on promoting early pregnancy recognition.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:47:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:47:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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