7.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148594
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evidence-Based Preceptor Development
Abstract:
Evidence-Based Preceptor Development
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Boyer, Susan A.
P.I. Institution Name:Mt. Ascutney Hospital
Title:Project Coordinator, Vermont Nurse Internship
[Clinical Session Presentation] Providing safe and competent care starts with the initial transition of the novice practitioner.  The first line of support for providing safe, effective quality care is the preceptor.  Most transition programs use preceptor-based systems, but few consistently invest in the development and support of preceptors. To ensure safe practice, intensive education, support and time of the preceptor are required.  VT Nurse Internship Project (VNIP) developed both statewide preceptor development and nurse internships.  With over 8 years of project implementation and data collection, VNIP has learned about the specific preparation and support that the preceptor role requires.  Based on formative and summative data collection, VNIP expanded the traditional view of the roles of the preceptor.  Previous frameworks had identified the importance of the role model, socializer and teacher functions (Alspach, 2000)  of the preceptor. VNIP found that the ?protector ? and ?competency validator? roles are key to ensuring competent and safe care. To fulfill these roles; adequate time, resources of a strong competency performance system, and skilled preceptors are needed.The ?Protector? role ensures the safety of both patient and novice from making errors, adhering to policy and procedures and providing a safe learning environment to develop skills. This initial emphasis on safety is reinforced through critical thinking development and reflective practices.  The "Competency validator role" requires that they observe performance of the novice.  Preceptors utilize competency based performance outcomes, to validate performance, identify limitations and discuss performance issues with the manager. These competencies standardize what is essential that a nurse must be able to perform to be competent to practice.   Ongoing formative and summative data collection have shaped the program and the instruction. The preceptor's effectiveness is evaluated continuously, with a system that focuses on performance development for both the preceptor and novices.   This ensures the necessary structure for skills development and competency assessment that protects the safety of our clients.  The intent and direction of the VNIP program is validated by several recent studies as reported in the Journal of Advanced Nursing [i]and  Foundation for Nursing Excellence.[ii]  This presentation will summarize the significant findings and outcomes of the VNIP work, as relates to preceptor development and support systems.  [i] Fero, Laura, Witsberger, Cartherine, Wesmiller, Susan, Zullo, Thomas, Hoffman, Leslie. Critical thinking ability of new graduate and experienced nuses. Journal of Advanced Nursing, volume 65, Number I, January, 2009.[ii] Foundations for Nursing Excellence, North Carolina, Evidence- Based Transition to Nursing Practice Initiative n North Carolina Summary of Phase 1 findings, January, 2009, www.ffne.org. Alspach, J. G. (2000). From Staff Nurse to Preceptor: A Preceptor Development Program, 2nd Ed., . American Assoc. of Critical Care Nurses.Fero, L. W. (2009). Critical thinking ability of new graduate and experienced nurses . Journal of Advanced Nursing , volume 65, Number I, January. Foundations for Nursing Excellence, North Carolina, Evidence- Based Transition to Nursing Practice Initiative in North Carolina Summary of Phase 1 findings, January, 2009, www.ffne.org.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvidence-Based Preceptor Developmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148594-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evidence-Based Preceptor Development</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Boyer, Susan A.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Mt. Ascutney Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Project Coordinator, Vermont Nurse Internship</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">daystarfarm@earthlink.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical Session Presentation] Providing safe and competent care starts with the initial transition of the novice practitioner.&nbsp; The first line of support for providing safe, effective quality care is the preceptor.&nbsp; Most transition programs use preceptor-based systems, but few consistently invest in the development and support of preceptors. To ensure safe practice, intensive education, support and time of the preceptor are required.&nbsp; VT Nurse Internship Project (VNIP) developed both statewide preceptor development and nurse internships.&nbsp; With over 8 years of project implementation and data collection, VNIP has learned about the specific preparation and support that the preceptor role requires.&nbsp;&nbsp;Based on formative and summative data collection, VNIP expanded the traditional view of the roles of the preceptor.&nbsp; Previous frameworks had identified the importance of the role model, socializer and teacher functions (Alspach, 2000) &nbsp;of the preceptor. VNIP found that the ?protector ? and ?competency validator? roles are key to ensuring competent and safe care. To fulfill these roles; adequate time, resources of a strong competency performance system, and skilled preceptors are needed.The ?Protector? role ensures the safety of both patient and novice from making errors, adhering to policy and procedures and providing a safe learning environment to develop skills. This initial emphasis on safety is reinforced through critical thinking development and reflective practices.&nbsp; The &quot;Competency validator role&quot; requires that they observe performance of the novice.&nbsp; Preceptors utilize competency based performance outcomes, to validate performance, identify limitations and discuss performance issues with the manager. These competencies standardize what is essential that a nurse must be able to perform to be competent to practice.&nbsp; &nbsp;Ongoing formative and summative data collection have shaped the program and the instruction. The preceptor's effectiveness is evaluated continuously, with a system that focuses on performance development for both the preceptor and novices.&nbsp;&nbsp; This ensures the necessary structure for skills development and competency assessment that protects the safety of our clients.&nbsp; The intent and direction of the VNIP program is validated by several recent studies as reported in the Journal of Advanced Nursing [i]and&nbsp; Foundation for Nursing Excellence.[ii]&nbsp; This presentation will summarize the significant findings and outcomes of the VNIP work, as relates to preceptor development and support systems.&nbsp; [i] Fero, Laura, Witsberger, Cartherine, Wesmiller, Susan, Zullo, Thomas, Hoffman, Leslie. Critical thinking ability of new graduate and experienced nuses. Journal of Advanced Nursing, volume 65, Number I, January, 2009.[ii] Foundations for Nursing Excellence, North Carolina, Evidence- Based Transition to Nursing Practice Initiative n North Carolina Summary of Phase 1 findings, January, 2009, www.ffne.org. Alspach, J. G. (2000). From Staff Nurse to Preceptor: A Preceptor Development Program, 2nd Ed., . American Assoc. of Critical Care Nurses.Fero, L. W. (2009). Critical thinking ability of new graduate and experienced nurses . Journal of Advanced Nursing , volume 65, Number I, January. Foundations for Nursing Excellence, North Carolina, Evidence- Based Transition to Nursing Practice Initiative in North Carolina Summary of Phase 1 findings, January, 2009, www.ffne.org.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:47:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:47:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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