Nursing Home Resident Fall Events: Assessing the Role of the Environment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148644
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Home Resident Fall Events: Assessing the Role of the Environment
Abstract:
Nursing Home Resident Fall Events: Assessing the Role of the Environment
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Hill, Elizabeth E., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Johns Hopkins University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Madeline Sylvia, BA; Jennifer A. Wenzel, PhD, RN, CCM
[Clinical Session Presentation] Background: Falls are a leading cause of injury among adults aged 65 and older, with an estimated 750,000 nursing home residents falling annually. Nursing home environmental factors, while previously suggested as possible contributors to fall events, are not well documented. The purpose of this pilot project is to examine and record environmental factors that may contribute to fall events experienced by elderly nursing home residents. Methods: Currently 11 of the 15 targeted environmental assessments have been performed at a 200-bed non-profit sub-acute and long-term care facility in Baltimore.  Environmental assessments include qualitative and quantitative observations of room dimensions, lighting, floor surfaces, furniture and associated factors (i.e. obstacles, call bells).  Resident rooms and hallways are assessed by a trained research assistant within 72 hours of consented resident fall events. Descriptive data and qualitative environmental observations were recorded by hand at the time of assessment. Descriptive statistics are computed in Microsoft Excel, and content analysis of the environmental observations was performed in Microsoft Word. Results: Preliminary analyses reveal that furniture and other objects on the floor frequently obstruct access to closets (90%) and bedside drawers (70%). Lighting is observed to be inaccessible (90%), inadequate (30%) or resulting in glare on the floor in 20% of the rooms. Content analyses suggest issues with limited walking space in resident rooms and hallways as well as obstacles/clutter on floor surfaces. Conclusions: Our initial findings highlight the importance of addressing modifiable environmental characteristics when designing interventions to prevent falls experienced by nursing home elders. Overcrowding and clutter in resident rooms, for example, present a hazard for older adults when ambulating and can be easily identified and remedied by nursing staff efforts and the commitment of nursing administration to fall prevention. Funding was provided by the Center for Collaborative Intervention Research: National Institute of Nursing Research P30NRO8995.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Home Resident Fall Events: Assessing the Role of the Environmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148644-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Home Resident Fall Events: Assessing the Role of the Environment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hill, Elizabeth E., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Johns Hopkins University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ehill01@jhu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Madeline Sylvia, BA; Jennifer A. Wenzel, PhD, RN, CCM</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical Session Presentation] Background: Falls are a leading cause of injury among adults aged 65 and older, with an estimated 750,000 nursing home residents falling annually. Nursing home environmental factors, while previously suggested as possible contributors to fall events, are not well documented. The purpose of this pilot project is to examine and record environmental factors that may contribute to fall events experienced by elderly nursing home residents. Methods: Currently 11 of the 15 targeted environmental assessments have been performed at a 200-bed non-profit sub-acute and long-term care facility in Baltimore. &nbsp;Environmental assessments include qualitative and quantitative observations of room dimensions, lighting, floor surfaces, furniture and associated factors (i.e. obstacles, call bells). &nbsp;Resident rooms and hallways are assessed by a trained research assistant within 72 hours of consented resident fall events. Descriptive data and qualitative environmental observations were recorded by hand at the time of assessment. Descriptive statistics are computed in Microsoft Excel, and content analysis of the environmental observations was performed in Microsoft Word. Results: Preliminary analyses reveal that furniture and other objects on the floor frequently obstruct access to closets (90%) and bedside drawers (70%). Lighting is observed to be inaccessible (90%), inadequate (30%) or resulting in glare on the floor in 20% of the rooms. Content analyses suggest issues with limited walking space in resident rooms and hallways as well as obstacles/clutter on floor surfaces. Conclusions: Our initial findings highlight the importance of addressing modifiable environmental characteristics when designing interventions to prevent falls experienced by nursing home elders. Overcrowding and clutter in resident rooms, for example, present a hazard for older adults when ambulating and can be easily identified and remedied by nursing staff efforts and the commitment of nursing administration to fall prevention. Funding was provided by the Center for Collaborative Intervention Research: National Institute of Nursing Research P30NRO8995.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:48:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:48:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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