2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148647
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Differences in Diabetes Care Based on Payer Status
Abstract:
Differences in Diabetes Care Based on Payer Status
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Hossler, Charles L., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Marshall University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Carolyn Jenkins, DrPH, RD, CDE, APRN-BC-ADM, FAAN; Marilyn G. King, RN
[Scientific Session Presentation] Introduction: The purpose was to examine the effect of payer status on indicators of the quality of diabetes care delivered in four health care systems that participated in a REACH Coalition?s efforts to eliminate health care disparities for African Americans with diabetes.Design and Methods: Secondary analyses of data extracted from 899 health care records of people who received diabetes care were conducted to determine differences in quality of care by payer status. Extracted information included A1C, lipid, and kidney testing and frequencies, foot examinations, and blood pressure measurements as well as intermediate outcome measures of blood pressure, A1C, lipid, and kidney test results. Multivariate logistic regression, which included variables that had a change >10% for any payer status (based on odds ratio), was used to predict the likelihood of a person with diabetes receiving a care measure and/or achieving desired intermediate outcomes related to diabetes control. Results: There were no significant differences observed except: (1) LDL cholesterol control where Medicare enrollees and Medicaid recipients experienced poorer outcomes than those with commercial insurance; and (2) foot exams where Medicaid recipients received fewer annual exams than those with no insurance.Conclusions: Payer status had little effect on quality of diabetes care among this population. Other influences not accounted for in this study apparently have a great impact on quality of care in these four health systems.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDifferences in Diabetes Care Based on Payer Statusen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148647-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Differences in Diabetes Care Based on Payer Status</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hossler, Charles L., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Marshall University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hosslerc@marshall.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Carolyn Jenkins, DrPH, RD, CDE, APRN-BC-ADM, FAAN; Marilyn G. King, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific Session Presentation] Introduction: The purpose was to examine the effect of payer status on indicators of the quality of diabetes care delivered in four health care systems that participated in a REACH Coalition?s efforts to eliminate health care disparities for African Americans with diabetes.Design and Methods: Secondary analyses of data extracted from 899 health care records of people who received diabetes care were conducted to determine differences in quality of care by payer status. Extracted information included A1C, lipid, and kidney testing and frequencies, foot examinations, and blood pressure measurements as well as intermediate outcome measures of blood pressure, A1C, lipid, and kidney test results. Multivariate logistic regression, which included variables that had a change &gt;10% for any payer status (based on odds ratio), was used to predict the likelihood of a person with diabetes receiving a care measure and/or achieving desired intermediate outcomes related to diabetes control. Results: There were no significant differences observed except: (1) LDL cholesterol control where Medicare enrollees and Medicaid recipients experienced poorer outcomes than those with commercial insurance; and (2) foot exams where Medicaid recipients received fewer annual exams than those with no insurance.Conclusions: Payer status had little effect on quality of diabetes care among this population. Other influences not accounted for in this study apparently have a great impact on quality of care in these four health systems.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:48:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:48:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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