Information Disclosure Practices and Attitudes towards Health Decision-Making in Japanese Nurses and Physicians

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148650
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Information Disclosure Practices and Attitudes towards Health Decision-Making in Japanese Nurses and Physicians
Abstract:
Information Disclosure Practices and Attitudes towards Health Decision-Making in Japanese Nurses and Physicians
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Ito, Misae, MSN, RN, NMW
P.I. Institution Name:Kawasaki University of Medical Welfare
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Sue Turale, EdD, MSt, RN, RPN, FRCNA, FACMHN; Takahiro Kakeda, RN, PHN; Kyoko Murakami, PhD, RN, NMW; Miki Saito, RN, PHN, MSN; Simpei Hayashi, RN, PHN, MSN; Keiko Hattori, RN, MCPN, PhD; Noritoshi Tanida, MD, PhD
[Scientific Session Presentation] In Japan, like in other parts of Asia, there has been an especial history of medical care being paternalistic, for example, health providers withholding life-threatening illness information from patients. Recently many Japanese patients want disclosure of their diagnosis and prognosis, for example when cancer may cause death in young patients, and doctors often include families in decision-making about a patient?s health. Such practices have the potential to cause ethical dilemmas and problems for nurses who feel obliged to assist with the withholding of information. This study clarified the perceptions of 279 Japanese clinical nurses and 73 physicians regarding their experiences with family requests regarding health care decision making and desired involvement of patient in decision making. Following research approval, a structured self-descriptive questionnaire was administered in two teaching hospitals. Data was analysed using descriptive statistics. Twenty to 30 % of nurses and physicians experienced at least one family request to withhold information about a patient?s diagnosis and prognosis. The majority of respondents experiencing such requests abided by them to some degree. The extent to which the nurses and physicians talked about a patient?s prognosis to the patient and family were varied. Approximately 70% of physicians and nurses thought that families could make decisions about important medical treatments for competent patients in some circumstances. One third of nurses and physicians expressed no family decision making for competent patient. The preferences regarding the decision making process for competent patients were more centered on the fact that a patient makes a final decision after consulting with physician and family. Data showed that there were distressing ethical concerns among physicians and nurses regarding information disclosure when talking to patients and the families in a variety of situations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInformation Disclosure Practices and Attitudes towards Health Decision-Making in Japanese Nurses and Physiciansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148650-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Information Disclosure Practices and Attitudes towards Health Decision-Making in Japanese Nurses and Physicians</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ito, Misae, MSN, RN, NMW</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kawasaki University of Medical Welfare</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">m-ito@mw.kawasaki-m.ac.jp</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sue Turale, EdD, MSt, RN, RPN, FRCNA, FACMHN; Takahiro Kakeda, RN, PHN; Kyoko Murakami, PhD, RN, NMW; Miki Saito, RN, PHN, MSN; Simpei Hayashi, RN, PHN, MSN; Keiko Hattori, RN, MCPN, PhD; Noritoshi Tanida, MD, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific Session Presentation] In Japan, like in other parts of Asia, there has been an especial history of medical care being paternalistic, for example, health providers withholding life-threatening illness information from patients. Recently many Japanese patients want disclosure of their diagnosis and prognosis, for example when cancer may cause death in young patients, and doctors often include families in decision-making about a patient?s health. Such practices have the potential to cause ethical dilemmas and problems for nurses who feel obliged to assist with the withholding of information. This study clarified the perceptions of 279 Japanese clinical nurses and 73 physicians regarding their experiences with family requests regarding health care decision making and desired involvement of patient in decision making. Following research approval, a structured self-descriptive questionnaire was administered in two teaching hospitals. Data was analysed using descriptive statistics. Twenty to 30 % of nurses and physicians experienced at least one family request to withhold information about a patient?s diagnosis and prognosis. The majority of respondents experiencing such requests abided by them to some degree. The extent to which the nurses and physicians talked about a patient?s prognosis to the patient and family were varied. Approximately 70% of physicians and nurses thought that families could make decisions about important medical treatments for competent patients in some circumstances. One third of nurses and physicians expressed no family decision making for competent patient. The preferences regarding the decision making process for competent patients were more centered on the fact that a patient makes a final decision after consulting with physician and family. Data showed that there were distressing ethical concerns among physicians and nurses regarding information disclosure when talking to patients and the families in a variety of situations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:48:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:48:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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