The Healthy Choices Intervention Program: A Pediatric Primary Care Intervention for Overweight and Obese 9-12 Year Old Children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148653
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Healthy Choices Intervention Program: A Pediatric Primary Care Intervention for Overweight and Obese 9-12 Year Old Children
Abstract:
The Healthy Choices Intervention Program: A Pediatric Primary Care Intervention for Overweight and Obese 9-12 Year Old Children
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Jacobson, Diana L., MS, RN, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Research Coordinator
Co-Authors:Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAAN
[Scientific Session Presentation] Background: Pediatric overweight and obesity have become major daily concerns for primary healthcare providers. 17.1% of children and adolescents in the US between the ages of 6 and 19 years have a BMI = 95%.  This dramatic increase in overweight/obese youth has led to the emergence of associated chronic co-morbidities affecting every body system, including the child?s psychosocial health. Currently, expert opinion is guiding practice for primary care providers concerning overweight and obesity in the pediatric population.Purpose: To discuss the feasibility and acceptability of the Healthy Choices Intervention Program (HCI), a pediatric obesity intervention intended for healthcare providers to utilize in primary care. Methods: HCI is a manualized seven session clinic and telephone intervention that provides guidance and education to parents and overweight and obese 9-12 year old children utilizing Cognitive Behavior Theory, and nutrition and physical activity counseling. The intervention was delivered by alternating weekly in-person clinic meetings with telephone sessions. Children and parents completed daily pedometer, food diary, goal sheets, and mood logs. Participants also completed homework assignments after each clinic and telephone session. Results: A convenience sample of 17 parent-child dyads participated in this pilot. The child?s mean age is 129 months (SD = 15 months); parent?s mean age is 39.76 years (SD = 7.92 years).The child?s mean BMI for this sample is 26.1 (SD = 3.13); parent mean BMI is 34.0 (SD = 7.56). The children?s mean BMI percentile is .96 (SD = .04) with BMI percentile ranged from .859 to .992. Six families (35%) identify as Hispanic; 11 (65%) families as Caucasian. Implications: The HCI program was enthusiastically endorsed by all of the participating families. Delivering this intervention in primary care was determined to be feasible and acceptable. Cue recognition, goal setting, and monitoring of daily activities measured participant engagement and build intervention fidelity.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Healthy Choices Intervention Program: A Pediatric Primary Care Intervention for Overweight and Obese 9-12 Year Old Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148653-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Healthy Choices Intervention Program: A Pediatric Primary Care Intervention for Overweight and Obese 9-12 Year Old Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jacobson, Diana L., MS, RN, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">diana.jacobson@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific Session Presentation] Background: Pediatric overweight and obesity have become major daily concerns for primary healthcare providers. 17.1% of children and adolescents in the US between the ages of 6 and 19 years have a BMI = 95%. &nbsp;This dramatic increase in overweight/obese youth has led to the emergence of associated chronic co-morbidities affecting every body system, including the child?s psychosocial health. Currently, expert opinion is guiding practice for primary care providers concerning overweight and obesity in the pediatric population.Purpose: To discuss the feasibility and acceptability of the Healthy Choices Intervention Program (HCI), a pediatric obesity intervention intended for healthcare providers to utilize in primary care. Methods: HCI is a manualized seven session clinic and telephone intervention that provides guidance and education to parents and overweight and obese 9-12 year old children utilizing Cognitive Behavior Theory, and nutrition and physical activity counseling. The intervention was delivered by alternating weekly in-person clinic meetings with telephone sessions. Children and parents completed daily pedometer, food diary, goal sheets, and mood logs. Participants also completed homework assignments after each clinic and telephone session. Results: A convenience sample of 17 parent-child dyads participated in this pilot. The child?s mean age is 129 months (SD = 15 months); parent?s mean age is 39.76 years (SD = 7.92 years).The child?s mean BMI for this sample is 26.1 (SD = 3.13); parent mean BMI is 34.0 (SD = 7.56). The children?s mean BMI percentile is .96 (SD = .04) with BMI percentile ranged from&nbsp;.859 to .992. Six families (35%) identify as Hispanic; 11 (65%) families as Caucasian. Implications: The HCI program was enthusiastically endorsed by all of the participating families. Delivering this intervention in primary care was determined to be feasible and acceptable. Cue recognition, goal setting, and monitoring of daily activities measured participant engagement and build intervention fidelity.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:48:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:48:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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