Rural African-American Stimulant Users' Condom Use Self-Efficacy, Decisional Balance, and Stages of Change

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148665
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Rural African-American Stimulant Users' Condom Use Self-Efficacy, Decisional Balance, and Stages of Change
Abstract:
Rural African-American Stimulant Users' Condom Use Self-Efficacy, Decisional Balance, and Stages of Change
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Gullette, Donna L., DSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arkansas Medical Sciences
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Katharine E. Stewart, PhD; Brenda M. Booth, PhD; LeaVonne Pulley, PhD, MEd, BA; Patricia B. Wright, MPH, BSN, RN
[Scientific session research presentation] Background: The Southern United States has a higher HIV incidence rate (14.7/100,000) than all other US regions. The 2005 HIV incidence rate for African Americans in Arkansas was 4.98 times that of Whites. Rural African American stimulant users are at especially high risk, and urgently need effective sexual risk reduction interventions. Yet, very few interventions have been tested in this population. Purpose: This study applied the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) to sexual risk behaviors in rural African American stimulant users to identify stages of change (SOC) associated with condom use with main and casual partners, and to understand how self-efficacy and decisional balance are related to SOC. Method: Seventy-two participants (50% women) completed computer-assisted personal interviews using validated questionnaires focused on TTM constructs for condom use with main and casual partners. Findings: Most participants (77%) had a main sexual partner and more than half (54%) had at least one casual partner. Most of the participants (65%) were in earlier SOC (precontemplation, contemplation) for condom use with a main partner; but 59% were in the maintenance SOC for condom use with casual partners. Participants with higher self-efficacy (p<.0001) and who perceived more advantages (p<.05) for using a condom with a main partner were in the "action" or "maintenance" SOC. Likewise, perceived advantages (p<.0002) and higher self-efficacy (p<.0005) were associated with SOC for condom use with casual partners.   Conculsions: TTM constructs are useful in understanding patterns of condom use with main and casual partners.  Self-efficacy was a particularly strong predictor of SOC.  Implications: Interventions that focus on increasing self-efficacy for condom use with main partners may be more effective than those focused on changing decisional balance. Therefore, all sexual risk reduction interventions must address the important cultural and social influences on patterns of sexual behavior in target populations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRural African-American Stimulant Users' Condom Use Self-Efficacy, Decisional Balance, and Stages of Changeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148665-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Rural African-American Stimulant Users' Condom Use Self-Efficacy, Decisional Balance, and Stages of Change</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gullette, Donna L., DSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arkansas Medical Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dgullette@uams.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Katharine E. Stewart, PhD; Brenda M. Booth, PhD; LeaVonne Pulley, PhD, MEd, BA; Patricia B. Wright, MPH, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] Background: The Southern United States has a higher HIV incidence rate (14.7/100,000) than all other US regions. The 2005 HIV incidence rate for African Americans in Arkansas was 4.98 times that of Whites. Rural African American stimulant users are at especially high risk, and urgently need effective sexual risk reduction interventions. Yet, very few interventions have been tested in this population. Purpose: This study applied the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) to sexual risk behaviors in rural African American stimulant users to identify stages of change (SOC) associated with condom use with main and casual partners, and to understand how self-efficacy and decisional balance are related to SOC. Method: Seventy-two participants (50% women) completed computer-assisted personal interviews using validated questionnaires focused on TTM constructs for condom use with main and casual partners. Findings: Most participants (77%) had a main sexual partner and more than half (54%) had at least one casual partner. Most of the participants (65%) were in earlier SOC (precontemplation, contemplation) for condom use with a main partner; but 59% were in the maintenance SOC for condom use with casual partners. Participants with higher self-efficacy (p&lt;.0001) and who perceived more advantages (p&lt;.05) for using a condom with a main partner were in the &quot;action&quot; or &quot;maintenance&quot; SOC. Likewise, perceived advantages (p&lt;.0002) and higher self-efficacy (p&lt;.0005) were associated with SOC for condom use with casual partners.&nbsp;&nbsp; Conculsions: TTM constructs are useful in understanding patterns of condom use with main and casual partners.&nbsp; Self-efficacy was a particularly strong predictor of SOC.&nbsp; Implications: Interventions that focus on increasing self-efficacy for condom use with main partners may be more effective than those focused on changing decisional balance. Therefore, all sexual risk reduction interventions must address the important cultural and social influences on patterns of sexual behavior in target populations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:48:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:48:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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