Additive Effects of Cognitive and Physical Disability on Mortality in Older Adults with Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148679
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Additive Effects of Cognitive and Physical Disability on Mortality in Older Adults with Cancer
Abstract:
Additive Effects of Cognitive and Physical Disability on Mortality in Older Adults with Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Hodgson, Nancy A., RN, PhD, CS
P.I. Institution Name:Polisher Research Institute
Title:Senior research scientist
[Symposium scientific presentation] Background: Cognitive and physical disability frequently coexist in the older population with cancer. However the joint effect of these factors on cancer mortality risk is not well understood. This study examined whether the combination of varying levels of cognitive and physical disability affect the risk of mortality in older adults with cancer. Methods: Data were from the Medicare claims files linked to the AHEAD cohort of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a nationally representative panel of persons aged 70 and over. Analysis were limited to 340 respondents with incident cancer of the four leading types (lung, breast, prostate, colorectal). Participants were divided into mutually exclusive groups ranging from the best functioning on both measures to worst functioning on both measures. Mortality rates were compared across groups. Cox proportion hazards models were used to control for potential confounders such as demographics, comorbidity and site and stage of cancer. Results: Together, cognitive and physical disability differentiated between older adults at markedly different risk for mortality, ranging from 16% in the best group to 54%on the worst group. After adjusting for confounders, participants in the worst function in both measures remained at considerably higher risk from death than participants in the best function on both measures (adjusted hazard ratio 3.3: 95% confidence interval, 1.8-7.1). Conclusions: Given the significance of cognitive and physical disability on cancer survival, discussion focuses on the possible mechanisms of this relationship and the importance of nursing interventions targeting physical and cognitive function.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdditive Effects of Cognitive and Physical Disability on Mortality in Older Adults with Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148679-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Additive Effects of Cognitive and Physical Disability on Mortality in Older Adults with Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hodgson, Nancy A., RN, PhD, CS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Polisher Research Institute</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Senior research scientist</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nhodgson@pgc.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Symposium scientific presentation] Background: Cognitive and physical disability frequently coexist in the older population with cancer. However the joint effect of these factors on cancer mortality risk is not well understood. This study examined whether the combination of varying levels of cognitive and physical disability affect the risk of mortality in older adults with cancer. Methods: Data were from the Medicare claims files linked to the AHEAD cohort of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a nationally representative panel of persons aged 70 and over. Analysis were limited to 340 respondents with incident cancer of the four leading types (lung, breast, prostate, colorectal).&nbsp;Participants were divided into mutually exclusive groups ranging from the best functioning on both measures to worst functioning on both measures. Mortality rates were compared across groups. Cox proportion hazards models were used to control for potential confounders such as demographics, comorbidity and site and stage of cancer. Results: Together, cognitive and physical disability differentiated between older adults at markedly different risk for mortality, ranging from 16% in the best group to 54%on the worst group. After adjusting for confounders, participants in the worst function in both measures remained at considerably higher risk from death than participants in the best function on both measures (adjusted hazard ratio 3.3: 95% confidence interval, 1.8-7.1). Conclusions: Given the significance of cognitive and physical disability on cancer survival, discussion focuses on the possible mechanisms of this relationship and the importance of nursing interventions targeting physical and cognitive function.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:48:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:48:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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