Coping Strategies Used by Hispanic, Caucasian and African-American Parents Caring for Chronically Ill Children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148691
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Coping Strategies Used by Hispanic, Caucasian and African-American Parents Caring for Chronically Ill Children
Abstract:
Coping Strategies Used by Hispanic, Caucasian and African-American Parents Caring for Chronically Ill Children
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Joffe, Patricia, PhD, APRN, BC, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:New Jersey City University
Title:Associate Professor, RN-BSN Coordinator
[Clinical session research presentation] Nurses caring for chronically ill children and their families in the home environment have witnessed a rapid increase in the number of children that are cared for in the home.  Review of the literature identified gaps existing in the body of pediatric research related to culture and chronically ill children.  This study used the qualitative research paradigm to explore the coping strategies of families as they integrate the care of the chronically ill child into their life ways. The study examined how African - American, Caucasian and Hispanic families coped with chronic illness.  The sample included families from 3 cultural groups: 5 African - American, 5 Hispanics, and 4 Caucasians.  The 14 caregivers were interviewed in their homes. Grounded theory was used to develop a theory from systematically generated descriptive data. Coping strategies allowed these families to deal with chronic illness in their children. Important cultural themes on coping emerged from data collected from each cultural group that have implications to assist nurses to help culturally diverse families.  It is essential for nursing to understand parents' perceptions and coping from a cultural viewpoint.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCoping Strategies Used by Hispanic, Caucasian and African-American Parents Caring for Chronically Ill Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148691-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Coping Strategies Used by Hispanic, Caucasian and African-American Parents Caring for Chronically Ill Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Joffe, Patricia, PhD, APRN, BC, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">New Jersey City University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor, RN-BSN Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">p.joffe@verizon.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical session research presentation] Nurses caring for chronically ill children and their families in the home environment have witnessed a rapid increase in the number of children that are cared for in the home.&nbsp; Review of the literature identified gaps existing in the body of pediatric research related to culture and chronically ill children.&nbsp; This study used the qualitative research paradigm to explore the coping strategies of families as they integrate the care of the chronically ill child into their life ways.&nbsp;The study examined how African - American, Caucasian and Hispanic families coped with chronic illness.&nbsp; The sample included families from 3 cultural groups: 5 African - American, 5 Hispanics, and 4 Caucasians.&nbsp; The 14 caregivers were interviewed in their homes.&nbsp;Grounded theory was used to develop a theory from systematically generated descriptive data. Coping strategies allowed these families to deal with chronic illness in their children.&nbsp;Important cultural themes on coping emerged from data collected from each cultural group that have implications to assist nurses to help culturally diverse families.&nbsp; It is essential for nursing to understand parents' perceptions and coping from a cultural viewpoint.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:49:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:49:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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