2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148705
Type:
Presentation
Title:
How Women with HIV Infection Manage Personal Relationships
Abstract:
How Women with HIV Infection Manage Personal Relationships
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Kozy, Mary A., MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Toledo
Title:Assistant Professor
[Clinical session research presentation] Current treatment strategies have rendered HIV infection a chronic but manageable illness. Thus, scientific inquiry has expanded beyond strategies that assure survival and into strategies that promote optimum health for individuals affected by this illness. The works of Jean Baker Miller and Carol Gilligan have emphasized the role of relationships in the emotional and moral development of women. It is within a network of caring relationships that women develop both a unique identity and a sense of belonging.  The infectious nature of HIV infection and the stigma associated with it have the potential to disrupt a woman's relationships. The purpose of this study is to explore, through the research method of Grounded Theory, how women with HIV infection manage their relationships. A sample of 15 women recruited from a medical clinic for families of individuals with HIV infection volunteered to participate in this study by agreeing to participate in a semi structured interview about their relationships. The data from transcribed audio tapes were managed with Atlasti software. To assure audit-ability of data analysis the investigator utilized journals and memos. Journaling helps to identify reactivity and bias on the part of the investigator. Memos assist in tracking the analytical process as concepts and their relationships were identified.  Keeping true to the philosophy of Straus and Corbin, the originators of Grounded Theory methodology, every attempt is made to allow the concepts to emerge and avoid forcing the data.  Data is analyzed simultaneously with data collection using a constant comparative method.  The transcripts are first analyzed for open coding, followed by axial coding and finally selective coding. The aim of the study is to identify at least one core concept symbolizing the process of managing relationships for Women with HIV infection.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHow Women with HIV Infection Manage Personal Relationshipsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148705-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">How Women with HIV Infection Manage Personal Relationships</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kozy, Mary A., MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Toledo</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mary.kozy@utoledo.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical session research presentation] Current treatment strategies have rendered HIV infection a chronic but manageable illness. Thus, scientific inquiry has expanded beyond strategies that assure survival and into strategies that promote optimum health for individuals affected by this illness.&nbsp;The works of Jean Baker Miller and Carol Gilligan have emphasized the role of relationships in the emotional and moral development of women.&nbsp;It is within a network of caring relationships that women develop both a unique identity and a sense of belonging.&nbsp; The infectious nature of HIV infection and the stigma associated with it have the potential to disrupt a woman's relationships.&nbsp;The purpose of this study is to explore, through the research method of Grounded Theory, how women with HIV infection manage their relationships. A sample of 15 women recruited from a medical clinic for families of individuals with HIV infection volunteered to participate in this study by agreeing to participate in a semi structured interview about their relationships. The data from transcribed audio tapes were managed with Atlasti software.&nbsp;To assure audit-ability of data analysis the investigator utilized journals and memos.&nbsp;Journaling helps to identify reactivity and bias on the part of the investigator. Memos assist in tracking the analytical process as concepts and their relationships were identified.&nbsp; Keeping true to the philosophy of Straus and Corbin, the originators of Grounded Theory methodology, every attempt is made to allow the concepts to emerge and avoid forcing the data.&nbsp; Data is analyzed simultaneously with data collection using a constant comparative method.&nbsp; The transcripts are first analyzed for open coding, followed by axial coding and finally selective coding. The aim of the study is to identify at least one core concept symbolizing the process of managing relationships for Women with HIV infection.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:49:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:49:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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