Application of the Multi-Trait Multi-Method Technique to Multiple-Respondent Family Level Data

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148710
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Application of the Multi-Trait Multi-Method Technique to Multiple-Respondent Family Level Data
Abstract:
Application of the Multi-Trait Multi-Method Technique to Multiple-Respondent Family Level Data
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Larew, Charles, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pittsburgh
Title:Postdoctoral Fellow
[Clinical session research presentation] The multi-trait multi-method technique guided the examination of convergent and divergent validity when measuring family level traits with data collected from multiple respondents.   A cross-sectional design was utilized.   Family members of traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors quantified pre-morbid levels of family assistance across four domains of caregiving: personal care tasks, household tasks, financial support, and assisting with health care decisions.  The Family Inventory of Life Events (FILE) assessed family demands.  Family resiliency factors were measured by the Family Inventory of Resources for Management (FIRM), Family Hardiness Index (FHI), the Family Crisis Oriented Personal Evaluation Scales (F-COPES), and the Family Problem Solving Communication Index (FPSCI). The sample consisted of 29 caregiver pairs. The majority of caregivers were Caucasian (75.9%), female (69.0 %); parents or spouses (55.2 %); with less than an associate degree (53.4 %).  Subject age ranged from 22 to 73 years (mean=45.5, SD=12.0). Strong correlations were seen regarding pre-morbid assistance with personal care activities (r=.86, p<.01), financial support (r=.89, p<.01), and assistance with health care decisions (r=.76, p<.01).  Perceptions regarding assistance with household tasks were weakly correlated (r=.38, p<.05).   Moderately strong correlations (r=.50, p<.01) were seen in FILE scores.  FIRM scores were strongly correlated (r=.73, p<.01).  Moderately strong correlations were seen with FPSCI scores (r=.56, p<.01) while weaker relationships were seen between FHI scores (r=.39, p<.05).  High correlations (r >.75) were found among FIRM, FPSCI, FHI, and F-COPES scores.  Limitations include a convenience sample and small sample size. Low divergent validity for measures of family resiliency factors suggests a lack of conceptual distinction.  The data suggest that a single family representative may provide valid information regarding family demands and resources.  These findings may have implications for sampling and instrument selection although additional studies are needed to determine whether similar patterns of convergent/divergent validity are replicated in other caregiver samples.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleApplication of the Multi-Trait Multi-Method Technique to Multiple-Respondent Family Level Dataen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148710-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Application of the Multi-Trait Multi-Method Technique to Multiple-Respondent Family Level Data</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Larew, Charles, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pittsburgh</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Postdoctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">larewc@pitt.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical session research presentation] The multi-trait multi-method technique guided the examination of convergent and divergent validity when measuring family level traits with data collected from multiple respondents.&nbsp;&nbsp; A cross-sectional design was utilized.&nbsp;&nbsp; Family members of traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors quantified pre-morbid levels of family assistance across four domains of caregiving: personal care tasks, household tasks, financial support, and assisting with health care decisions.&nbsp; The Family Inventory of Life Events (FILE) assessed family demands.&nbsp; Family resiliency factors were measured by the Family Inventory of Resources for Management (FIRM), Family Hardiness Index (FHI), the Family Crisis Oriented Personal Evaluation Scales (F-COPES), and the Family Problem Solving Communication Index (FPSCI).&nbsp;The sample consisted of 29 caregiver pairs. The majority of caregivers were Caucasian (75.9%), female (69.0 %); parents or spouses (55.2 %); with less than an associate degree (53.4 %).&nbsp; Subject age ranged from 22 to 73 years (mean=45.5, SD=12.0). Strong correlations were seen regarding pre-morbid assistance with personal care activities (r=.86, p&lt;.01), financial support (r=.89, p&lt;.01), and assistance with health care decisions (r=.76, p&lt;.01).&nbsp; Perceptions regarding assistance with household tasks were weakly correlated (r=.38, p&lt;.05).&nbsp;&nbsp; Moderately strong correlations (r=.50, p&lt;.01) were seen in FILE scores.&nbsp; FIRM scores were strongly correlated (r=.73, p&lt;.01).&nbsp; Moderately strong correlations were seen with FPSCI scores (r=.56, p&lt;.01) while weaker relationships were seen between FHI scores (r=.39, p&lt;.05).&nbsp;&nbsp;High correlations (r &gt;.75) were found among FIRM, FPSCI, FHI, and F-COPES scores.&nbsp; Limitations include a convenience sample and small sample size. Low divergent validity for measures of family resiliency factors suggests a lack of conceptual distinction.&nbsp; The data suggest that a single family representative may provide valid information regarding family demands and resources.&nbsp; These findings may have implications for sampling and instrument selection although additional studies are needed to determine whether similar patterns of convergent/divergent validity are replicated in other caregiver samples.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:49:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:49:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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