2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148713
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prediction of HbA1c Control in Type 2 Diabetes
Abstract:
Prediction of HbA1c Control in Type 2 Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Lee, Hyeon Joo, MS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Maryland
Title:Doctoral Student
Co-Authors:Chi-Wen Kao, PhD, RN; Deborah W. Chapa, PhD, ACNP-BC; Deborah Jones, PhD, RN; Jane Kapustin, PhD, CRNP; Joan Davenport, PhD, RN; Sue A. Thomas, PhD, RN, FAAN; Erika Friedmann, PhD; Catherine M. Krichten, RN, MS, CRNP, CDE; Thomas W. Donner, MD
[Scientific session research presentation] Problem: Depression leads to poorer outcomes and increased risk of complications in diabetics.  Investigations based on the theory of a reciprocal relationship between depression and diabetes resulting from the disregulation of hypothalamic-pituitary axis have not established underlying mechanisms or direct causal relationship.  Depression is correlated with poor glycemic control (HbA1c) in type 1diabetes. A similar relationship has not been established in type 2 diabetes.Objective: This study was conducted to examine whether diabetes-related complications, depression, or quality of life predict diabetes control beyond the contributions of demographic characteristics in type 2 diabetes? Design: Cross sectional survey. Population, Sample, Setting: Type 2 diabetics (N=55) aged  (superscript 3) 35 years, 42% female, 36% African American were recruited by convenience sample from an inner city Joslin diabetes clinic. Variables: Dependent: HbA1c; Independent: demographics, depression, quality of life (QOL), diabetes-related macro (coronary artery disease, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, obesity) and micro (nephropathy, neuropathy, retinopathy) co-morbidities. Methods: After informed consent patients completed Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI, depression),  SF-36 (QOL), demographic questionnaire. Complications, HbA1c, height and weight were obtained from the medical record. Findings: HbA1c: 40% well controlled (equal to or less than 7%), 44% moderate-high (7-9%), and 16% very high [superscript 3) 9%].  All patients had at least 1 diabetes-related co-morbidity; 58% had (superscript 3) 1 micro co-morbidities; 64% had 2 -3 macro co-morbidities;  41% were depressed [BDI (superscript 3)13]; 27% moderately or severely depressed [BDI (superscript 3) 20].  Being black tended to predict higher HbA1c [F(1,51)=3.321, p=.074, R2=.06].  Neither gender nor age added significantly to prediction of HbA1c.  Neuropathy [F(1,50)=.979, p=.007, R2=.158] and retinopathy [F(1,50) =3.610, p=.063, R2=.089] added to the prediction beyond race, other co-morbidities didn?t.  Depression tended to add to prediction of HbA1c [F(1,50)=3.728, p=.059, R2=.091]; QOL did not. Conclusion: Longitudinal research is necessary to clarify the inter-relationship of depression, quality of life, self-care behaviors, and diabetes control in type 2 diabetics.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrediction of HbA1c Control in Type 2 Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148713-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Prediction of HbA1c Control in Type 2 Diabetes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lee, Hyeon Joo, MS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Maryland</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lee@son.umaryland.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Chi-Wen Kao, PhD, RN; Deborah W. Chapa, PhD, ACNP-BC; Deborah Jones, PhD, RN; Jane Kapustin, PhD, CRNP; Joan Davenport, PhD, RN; Sue A. Thomas, PhD, RN, FAAN; Erika Friedmann, PhD; Catherine M. Krichten, RN, MS, CRNP, CDE; Thomas W. Donner, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] Problem: Depression leads to poorer outcomes and increased risk of complications in diabetics.&nbsp; Investigations based on the theory of a reciprocal relationship between depression and diabetes resulting from the disregulation of hypothalamic-pituitary axis have not established underlying mechanisms or direct causal relationship.&nbsp; Depression is correlated with poor glycemic control (HbA1c) in type 1diabetes.&nbsp;A similar relationship has not been established in type 2 diabetes.Objective: This study was conducted to examine whether diabetes-related complications, depression, or quality of life predict diabetes control beyond the contributions of demographic characteristics in type 2 diabetes? Design: Cross sectional survey. Population, Sample, Setting: Type 2 diabetics (N=55) aged&nbsp; (superscript 3) 35 years, 42% female, 36% African American were recruited by convenience sample from an inner city Joslin diabetes clinic. Variables: Dependent: HbA1c; Independent: demographics, depression, quality of life (QOL), diabetes-related macro (coronary artery disease, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, obesity) and micro (nephropathy, neuropathy, retinopathy) co-morbidities. Methods: After informed consent patients completed Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI, depression),&nbsp; SF-36 (QOL), demographic questionnaire. Complications, HbA1c, height and weight were obtained from the medical record.&nbsp;Findings: HbA1c: 40% well controlled (equal to or less than 7%), 44% moderate-high (7-9%), and 16% very high [superscript 3) 9%].&nbsp; All patients had at least 1 diabetes-related co-morbidity; 58% had (superscript 3) 1 micro co-morbidities; 64% had 2 -3 macro co-morbidities;&nbsp; 41% were depressed [BDI (superscript 3)13]; 27% moderately or severely depressed [BDI (superscript 3) 20].&nbsp; Being black tended to predict higher HbA1c [F(1,51)=3.321, p=.074, R2=.06].&nbsp; Neither gender nor age added significantly to prediction of HbA1c.&nbsp; Neuropathy [F(1,50)=.979, p=.007, R2=.158] and retinopathy [F(1,50) =3.610, p=.063, R2=.089] added to the prediction beyond race, other co-morbidities didn?t.&nbsp; Depression tended to add to prediction of HbA1c [F(1,50)=3.728, p=.059, R2=.091]; QOL did not. Conclusion:&nbsp;Longitudinal research is necessary to clarify the inter-relationship of depression, quality of life, self-care behaviors, and diabetes control in type 2 diabetics.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:49:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:49:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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