Improving Healthcare Provider Cpr Competence through Performance Based Evaluation

13.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148727
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Healthcare Provider Cpr Competence through Performance Based Evaluation
Abstract:
Improving Healthcare Provider Cpr Competence through Performance Based Evaluation
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Mancini, Mary B., RN, PhD, CNA, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas at Arlington
Title:Associate Dean of Undergraduate Program
Co-Authors:Carolyn L. Cason, RN, PhD
[Special invitation presentation] This study evaluated differences in CPR competencies (compressions and ventilations) associated with three learning modalities that differed in length and presentation approach. Nurses and nursing students seeking recertification in AHA healthcare provider CPR were randomized to one of three groups. One completed the traditional 4-hour course (TRAD; n=102). The other two completed a 2-hour course that included interactive on-line learning and a practice-while-you-watch videotape. In one, learners viewed the videotape individually and controlled the pace (SOLO; n=109).  In the other, learners viewed the videotape in groups with pace controlled by a facilitator (GROUP; n=94). AHA certified CPR instructors and sensorized manikins (Skillreporters) evaluated ventilations and compressions during adult and infant CPR. Multivariate analyses of variance revealed: (a) instructors' ratings of adult CPR performance were equivalent, that is, no differences in performance associated with learning modality; (b) instructors? ratings indicated infant CPR performance of SOLO learners was significantly better than other learners; (c) adult Skillreporter data indicated that all learners had adequate compression depths and equivalent rates. For all, average per minute compression rate was less than 75.  TRAD and SOLO learners gave the same number of ventilations but SOLO learners tended to overinflate the lungs. TRAD and SOLO were equivalent on average 'hands off' time during CPR while GROUP time was significantly longer; and, (d) infant Skillreporter data revealed SOLO learners performed significantly better than other learners; however, all learners failed to achieve minimum performance standards. In conclusion, SOLO yielded better or equivalent performance outcomes when compared with TRAD. Consistent with other studies, many learners did not demonstrate minimal performance standards.  Because the SOLO course requires less time, more readily accommodates individual learner schedules, and requires fewer resources, it may serve as a way for learners, through repeated use, to improve their performance and ultimately save more lives.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Healthcare Provider Cpr Competence through Performance Based Evaluationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148727-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Improving Healthcare Provider Cpr Competence through Performance Based Evaluation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mancini, Mary B., RN, PhD, CNA, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas at Arlington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean of Undergraduate Program</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mancini@uta.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Carolyn L. Cason, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Special invitation presentation] This study evaluated differences in CPR competencies (compressions and ventilations) associated with three learning modalities that differed in length and presentation approach. Nurses and nursing students seeking recertification in AHA healthcare provider CPR were randomized to one of three groups. One completed the traditional 4-hour course (TRAD; n=102). The other two completed a 2-hour course that included interactive on-line learning and a practice-while-you-watch videotape. In one, learners viewed the videotape individually and controlled the pace (SOLO; n=109).&nbsp; In the other, learners viewed the videotape in groups with pace controlled by a facilitator (GROUP; n=94). AHA certified CPR instructors and sensorized manikins (Skillreporters) evaluated ventilations and compressions during adult and infant CPR. Multivariate analyses of variance revealed: (a) instructors' ratings of adult CPR performance were equivalent, that is, no differences in performance associated with learning modality; (b) instructors? ratings indicated infant CPR performance of SOLO learners was significantly better than other learners; (c) adult Skillreporter data indicated that all learners had adequate compression depths and equivalent rates. For all, average per minute compression rate was less than 75.&nbsp; TRAD and SOLO learners gave the same number of ventilations but SOLO learners tended to overinflate the lungs. TRAD and SOLO were equivalent on average 'hands off' time during CPR while GROUP time was significantly longer; and, (d) infant Skillreporter data revealed SOLO learners performed significantly better than other learners; however, all learners failed to achieve minimum performance standards. In conclusion, SOLO yielded better or equivalent performance outcomes when compared with TRAD. Consistent with other studies, many learners did not demonstrate minimal performance standards.&nbsp; Because the SOLO course requires less time, more readily accommodates individual learner schedules, and requires fewer resources, it may serve as a way for learners, through repeated use, to improve their performance and ultimately save more lives.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:49:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:49:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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