Families at Risk for Inherited Breast/Ovarian Cancer: The Use of the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model Analysis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148739
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Families at Risk for Inherited Breast/Ovarian Cancer: The Use of the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model Analysis
Abstract:
Families at Risk for Inherited Breast/Ovarian Cancer: The Use of the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model Analysis
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Mellon, Suzanne, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Detroit Mercy and Karmanos Cancer Institute
Title:Dean and Professor
Co-Authors:James Janisse, PhD; Robin Gold, MS, CGC; Michael Tainsky, PhD; Michael Simon, MD, MPH
[Scientific session research presentation] While families play an important role in risk assessment and genetic testing decisions for individuals at risk for inherited breast/ovarian cancer syndrome, little research has been carried out with individuals and their family members together regarding how they influence each other in their decision making, cancer worries, and risk appraisals about cancer risk information. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the use of the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model of dyadic analysis that assesses the effect of cancer survivors and family relatives on each other in one single analysis. This approach provides a unique perspective of looking at both individual and family factors that influence both dyad members by taking into account both of the dyad's predictor variable scores on each of the family member's outcomes. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was conducted with 146 breast and/or ovarian cancer survivors and 146 unaffected female relatives (N=292). Using the transtheoretical model of change and a family stress framework, a population-based sample, stratified by race (Caucasian and African-American) and by diagnosis (breast and ovarian), was randomly selected from the NCI SEER Cancer Registry in southeastern Michigan. Standardized instruments with adequate reliability and validity were used to measure study variables: family history of cancer, coping styles, self-efficacy, family communication, social support, perception of cancer risk, cancer worries, and decision making. Results indicated interdependence between family members' cancer worries and several "partner" effects of age, education, communication, and coping style influencing the other family member's decision making. Additionally, sociodemographic family factors of marital status, family member income, family cancer history, and role relationships influenced risk appraisals and cancer worries. These findings support the examination of inherited cancer risk decision making from a family dyadic perspective in order to help families have realistic risk appraisals and make informed decisions about their health surveillance options.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamilies at Risk for Inherited Breast/Ovarian Cancer: The Use of the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model Analysisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148739-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Families at Risk for Inherited Breast/Ovarian Cancer: The Use of the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model Analysis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mellon, Suzanne, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Detroit Mercy and Karmanos Cancer Institute</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dean and Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mellonsk@udmercy.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">James Janisse, PhD; Robin Gold, MS, CGC; Michael Tainsky, PhD; Michael Simon, MD, MPH</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] While families play an important role in risk assessment and genetic testing decisions for individuals at risk for inherited breast/ovarian cancer syndrome, little research has been carried out with individuals and their family members together regarding how they influence each other in their decision making, cancer worries, and risk appraisals about cancer risk information. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the use of the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model of dyadic analysis that assesses the effect of cancer survivors and family relatives on each other in one single analysis. This approach provides a unique perspective of looking at both individual and family factors that influence both dyad members by taking into account both of the dyad's predictor variable scores on each of the family member's outcomes. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was conducted with 146 breast and/or ovarian cancer survivors and 146 unaffected female relatives (N=292). Using the transtheoretical model of change and a family stress framework, a population-based sample, stratified by race (Caucasian and African-American) and by diagnosis (breast and ovarian), was randomly selected from the NCI SEER Cancer Registry in southeastern Michigan. Standardized instruments with adequate reliability and validity were used to measure study variables: family history of cancer, coping styles, self-efficacy, family communication, social support, perception of cancer risk, cancer worries, and decision making. Results indicated interdependence between family members' cancer worries and several &quot;partner&quot; effects of age, education, communication, and coping style influencing the other family member's decision making. Additionally, sociodemographic family factors of marital status, family member income, family cancer history, and role relationships influenced risk appraisals and cancer worries. These findings support the examination of inherited cancer risk decision making from a family dyadic perspective in order to help families have realistic risk appraisals and make informed decisions about their health surveillance options.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:49:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:49:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.